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Hub-Robeson Galleries Expose yourself... to the arts, collage of past exhibitions artwork

Current Exhibits

HUB Gallery

 

John McKaig: Drawings and Prints A colored-pencil drawing of a screaming face that resembles the artist near a welder's mask and above a sky-blue skeletal arm. Behind these elements is a flowing and wrinkled green fabric, that's in front of a hot pink background.

January 22 – March 1, 2018

Reception: February 8, 6–8pm
**This is a shared reception with the Art Alley exhibit.**

 

By using symbols and images and giving them a new context, John McKaig transforms them into a series of personal symbols describing layers of different “worlds” in order to depict his shifting identity that comes with the passage of time, his reflection of his identity and existential meaning, and to relate his experience to memories of specific events that defined him. He also layers and re-contextualizes formal elements as part of his exploration of how queer theory informs his work and his life; McKaig rejects the dominant standards in life and in imagery, and hopes that his re-contextualization of objects alludes to his exploration of his queer identity. Very often, McKaig doesn’t begin with a complete plan as to how the many layers of his works will affect each other, but takes an approach similar to that common in improvisational jazz, where he attempts to make them function on individual levels as well as in conduction with the other components.

The nautical imagery and objects that are so prevalent in his works are McKaig’s way of exploring the idea of passage through life, the idea of always being either “outward or homeward bound,” as the nautical saying goes, and to explore the idea of escape towards a potentially invigorating but perilous situation, as happens in an active life. By incorporating theatrical elements he poetically gives emphasis or inserts mis-direction, such as an element appearing both as a background and a significant component, in order to allude to a dual identity or different time relationships.
Depicting recognizable objects, spaces, and figurative elements allows McKaig to maintain a straight-forward connection to the viewers’ experiences. Because of his disdain for irony and cynicism, he endeavors to make his work approachable, but with the hope and expectation that it should be observed carefully and with contemplation. To that end, McKaig goes where his ideas take him, pushing aside ideas of over-analysis or cynicism, and exploring how to communicate a thematic approach in his work, often shifting to different media in order to explore how the inherent qualities of that media can allow him to make the viewer understand a richer connection between all the images.

 

 

School of Visual Arts
Annual Graduate Research Exhibition 2017 Winner "Azimuth" by Lindsey Landfried is a large drawing in shades of blue and purple which was made by repeating the same looping motion over and over again.

March 23 – April 22, 2018

By using symbols and images and giving them a new context, John McKaig transforms them into a series of personal symbols describing layers of different “worlds” in order to depict his shifting identity that comes with the passage of time, his reflection of his identity and existential meaning, and to relate his experience to memories of specific events that defined him. He also layers and re-contextualizes formal elements as part of his exploration of how queer theory informs his work and his life; McKaig rejects the dominant standards in life and in imagery, and hopes that his re-contextualization of objects alludes to his exploration of his queer identity. Very often, McKaig doesn’t begin with a complete plan as to how the many layers of his works will affect each other, but takes an approach similar to that common in improvisational jazz, where he attempts to make them function on individual levels as well as in conduction with the other components.

The nautical imagery and objects that are so prevalent in his works are McKaig’s way of exploring the idea of passage through life, the idea of always being either “outward or homeward bound,” as the nautical saying goes, and to explore the idea of escape towards a potentially invigorating but perilous situation, as happens in an active life. By incorporating theatrical elements he poetically gives emphasis or inserts mis-direction, such as an element appearing both as a background and a significant component, in order to allude to a dual identity or different time relationships.
Depicting recognizable objects, spaces, and figurative elements allows McKaig to maintain a straight-forward connection to the viewers’ experiences. Because of his disdain for irony and cynicism, he endeavors to make his work approachable, but with the hope and expectation that it should be observed carefully and with contemplation. To that end, McKaig goes where his ideas take him, pushing aside ideas of over-analysis or cynicism, and exploring how to communicate a thematic approach in his work, often shifting to different media in order to explore how the inherent qualities of that media can allow him to make the viewer understand a richer connection between all the images.

 



Robeson Gallery

 

State College Area School District
Annual K-12 Exhibition A heavily-textured black and white painting of a girl with her eyes closed.

January 4 – 27, 2018

Reception: January 27, 2–4pm

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two- and three-dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community. This annual exhibition provides the young artists an exciting opportunity to share their artwork with the community in a professional setting.

 

 

 

 

 

Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania
Annual Juried Exhibition Celebrating 50 Years A photograph of a pile of old paintbrushes caked with old remnants of bightly-colored paint. Laid overtop of the photograph is the number 50, where the 0 is made with the Art Alliance logo.

February 27 – April 27, 2018

Reception: April 26, 5:30–7pm

This juried exhibition celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania and showcases the work of our area’s many talented artists. This year’s juror is B. Stephen Carpenter II, Professor of Art Education and African American Studies; Co-Director of the Summer Institute on Contemporary Art (SICA); and Chief Executive Artist for Reservoir Studio at Penn State.

Founded in 1968, the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania is a nonprofit organization that exists to serve students, artists, and the art-loving public in Pennsylvania’s Centre County, the adjacent counties, and beyond. The Art Alliance builds bridges between teachers and art students of all ages and actively encourages community members to become involved in diverse and ever-changing art experiences. For more information on the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania, please visit their website.

 

 



Art Alley

A painting of a couple hiding in a tree. One of the figures is wearing a camoflage shirt and hiding their face. The entire painting is very simple in style.

Spilled Milk
Paintings by Elise Warfield

January 22 – March 12, 2018

Reception: February 8, 6–8pm
**This is a shared reception with the HUB Gallery exhibit.**

 

Elise Warfield’s painted scenes, rendered in a melange of painterly styles, are an amalgam of quotidian iconography held together by perspectives that don’t quite match. Set in a place that doesn’t shy away from being a lie, her paintings are slightly surreal but alluring enough that we might wish they were true. By filling her paintings with layered symbolism, Warfield creates an ever-elusive and constantly-transforming meaning, leaving nothing to grasp and creating a dizzying descent that provokes uneasy undercurrents beneath the idealistic suburban dream. This is a familiar place turned unpredictable: home doesn’t make sense anymore.

Elise Warfield is currently a senior at Penn State majoring in Drawing & Painting. She has been awarded the Margaret Griffen Schoenfelder Memorial Scholarship, the Margaret Ellen Gray Trustee Scholarship, and the William J. and Lois Kesterson Leight Scholarship. Warfield has shown her work in several solo and group exhibitions in the State College area and has been published in the winter issue of Studio Visit and the 2017 print edition of Kalliope.

 

 

An oil painting of a large plant in a maroon pot next to a window with light streaming in and hitting the wall behind the plant.

Penn State Center for Arts and Crafts
Annual Artists & Instructors Exhibition

March 30 – April 29, 2018

 

For more than 40 years the Center for Arts and Crafts has provided quality programs and services for the ever-changing social, educational and recreational needs of the Centre County Community. Their main office and classrooms are located in Ritenour Building at the corner of Pollock and Shortlidge Roads, and the Ceramics Studio is located in the HUB-Robeson Center.

The Center for Arts and Crafts offers a variety of non-credit adult art classes during Fall and Spring semesters, and children’s art camps in the summer. All classes are taught by Penn State University Art majors, Art Education majors, graduate students and professional artists.

 

 

 




Sculpture Corner

"'Sole' Stomper," a life-sized sculpture of a person constructed out of old sneakers.

The Stomper Project

 


The Stomper Project is the result of a collaboration between the Jana Marie foundation and local artists Annalisa Baron, Chris Bittner, Mel Forkner-Lesher, and Mark Pilato. The Stomper Project is a community art project that engages community members, students, artists, and professionals in discussions of mental health issues in order to raise awareness about mental and emotional health. Life-sized sculptures called Stompers are fashioned out of used sneakers to symbolize the effort to stomp out the stigma surrounding mental health.

Often, the fear of discrimination for disclosing the possibility of a mental or emotional problem causes sufferers to feel shame and silently delay seeking treatment for their mental illness. By engaging local schools and organizations, the Jana Marie Foundation and their team of artists work with the various groups to help them capture and share their personal stories related to mental health and mental illness.

 

 



Display Cases

An odd-looking bear made from an assortment of found materials including a toy animal nose, flowers, potting soil, and power cord for a tail.

Pigs, Process, Sustainability
Sculpture by Maria Lupo

January 15 – March 15, 2018

Maria Lupo’s work is rooted in the ecological cycles of nature and one’s relationship to the natural world. The images evoke a mythopoetic relationship with nature that expresses places and creatures both real and imagined. Through the use of tactile, natural materials such as grass seed, spanish moss, topsoil, and feathers the artwork fuses ecology and mythology bearing witness to nature’s power as well as its vulnerability.

Lupo begins her process by searching through dollar stores, toy departments, and garage sales, a process that she likens to a treasure hunt. Searching through materials starts her organic and fluid artistic process, and as she finds just the right body and nose pairing she begins mixing her topsoil and developing a name, personality, and images for her mythical creature.

Maria Lupo was born and raised in Newark, NJ and received her BFA from Rutgers University. As part f her studies at Rutgers University, Lupo began her sculptural studies in Cennina, Italy. She continued her studies in Sculpture at Hunter College, CUNY, receiving a Master’s of Fine Arts degree. In addition to her studies as a fine artist, Lupo has completed her Post-Masters Specialization in Art Therapy from Caldwell College and is a Registered Art Therapist, holding a second Masters Degree in Counseling Psychology. Currently, she is a Doctoral Candidate in Medical Humanities at Drew University.

 

Dangly earrings that feature a sleepy, baby-faced sun above a black tassel.

Suzanne Nugent

January 15 – March 15, 2018

As a child Suzanne Nugent was infatuated by windup music boxes where opening the drawer causes an articulated figure, most commonly a ballerina or clown, to start joyfully dancing. As an adult, she discovered Victorian sand automation toys that instead of using a windup mechanism, work by flipping the box 180 degrees so that the sand runs down and directly animates the figures. Her love of these simple music box automata significantly influence her paper puppets, which she makes entirely by hand using acid-free watercolor paper.

Nugent’s interest in jewelry making is much more recent, beginning with buying a Shrinky Dink craft kit for her kids in early 2017. While her daughters were working on their own shrunken crafts, Nugent discovered that she could make serious pieces that she could wear herself. Since then she’s created numerous designs, incorporating her own drawings and experimenting with metallic foils and resin. Around the same time that she began making jewelry, Nugent was battling granulomatous mastitis, a rare breast autoimmune disease. The disease opened her eyes to the world of other autoimmune diseases which in turn inspired much of the blue and purple butterfly jewelry designs that honor thyroid and lupus diseases.

Suzanne Nugent was born and raised in State College. After graduating from State College Area High School, she attended Moore College of Art & Design in Philadelphia, which is one of only two art colleges for women. She earned her BFA in Illustration in 2004 and now lives in Haddonfield, NJ with her husband and two daughters. She has illustrated interior drawings for many Choose Your Own Adventure books, created work for Tommy Hilfiger, and has completed many private commissions.

 

 



Art on the Move

Old Main

Jeanne McKinney

January 18 – June 18, 2018A pastel drawing of a lush green rolling field with mountains in the background.

“I feel blessed to live in such a beautiful area, surrounded by mountains to explore, streams and rivers to fish, and an abundant source of inspiring landscape to paint. I hope to interpret my work, for others, that which moves me when I view the land.”

Natural elements, such as the soothing sound of a waterfall, the smell of a field of freshly baled hay, or the feel of a rocky climb, trigger Jeanne McKinney’s desire to capture their spirit in a painted image. By working directly outdoors, she not only paints the landscape, but becomes a real part of the landscape thus allowing her to express a more authentic and honest interpretation.

McKinney begins her artistic process by developing several studies followed by a gestural drawing in nupastel with a turpenoid wash. A variety of soft pastels are applied loosely over the under paintings working from the general to the specific. She often works with a limited palette of pastels to bring cohesiveness to a painting.

Jeanne McKinney is a Penn State alumna and currently resides in the State College area. She is a member of several local and national professional artist groups and has studied painting workshops with numerous Juried Associate Members of the Pastel Society of America. McKinney has exhibited her paintings in juried national and regional exhibitions, and her work can be found locally at The State College Framing Company and Gallery, The Green Drake Gallery and Arts Center, and the Gallery Shop in Lemont, Pennsylvania.

 

 

Lindsey Duffey

September 18, 2017 – January 17, 2018

A very simple, geometric photo of the rear reflector on a red 8-person bicycle.

Lindsey Duffey’s photographs highlight the details of everyday objects that might otherwise go unnoticed or unappreciated. This series focuses specifically on unique bicycles from the collection of Bob “The Bike Guy” Swaim. She intentionally composed each photograph so that the viewer’s attention is directed towards a single, small component removing the context of the overall object. Duffey does this as a way of inviting the viewer to look at the bikes beyond their purpose as a form of transportation and begin looking at them as pieces of art.

Lindsey Duffey earned her BFA in Applied Media Arts from Edinboro University in 2012 and currently resides in the State College area.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Student Health Center

Claire PicardA painting of abstracted human figures at a slumber party, painting their nails and making prank phone calls.

January 29 – May 2, 2018

 

In this series of paintings, Claire Picard uses her experience of growing up in a structured community to illustrate the struggles of childhood. Through her use of androgynous figures and conflicting environments, Picard explores the issues of authority, body image, gender and sexuality. Common scenes of childhood and uncanny experiences are used to create deceptively creepy paintings that leave viewers with an internal struggle.

Claire Picard grew up New Canaan, Connecticut, where she started painting at a young age. Picard is an active member of the SOVA community and is currently double-majoring in Art Education and Painting and Drawing at Penn State. Presently, she is working on her Schreyer Honors Thesis investigating STEM curriculum. Picard will be hosting her first solo show in early January, involving a series of oil paintings and watercolor studies.

 


North Halls

Lydia Walton

January 25 – April 27, 2018

 
A drawing of a crowd of young people enjoying a concert. In the foreground, a young woman sits on the shoulders of another young woman.

There’s something fascinating about a group of friends having a conversation. The subtle flicks of fingers and matching rise and fall of voices, the undulation of the crowd. Lydia Walton draws those moments; the lounging, the talking, the tilt of a chair’s legs leaned too far away from the ground. She brings those people into her imagination, separates them from their flawed reality, and lets them spill onto the page, altered to fit a strange world of her design that features similarly altered busses, streets, buildings, and other everyday environments. Walton’s work seeks to explore pervasive themes in popular entertainment as well as the effect of popular media on social interaction.

Lydia Walton is currently a senior at Penn State majoring in Painting and Drawing.

 

 

 

 

West Halls

Remembered
Paintings by Allison Sheppard A closely-cropped painting of an armchair and end table, with floral walpaper. The paint has been allowed to drip and run as it dried.

January 31 – April 30, 2018

 

In this series of paintings, Allison Sheppard focused on capturing familiar spaces; overlaying the real spaces of her childhood home with her memories of the space, focusing on what she remembers most.

In order to strengthen her personal connections to each painting, Sheppard built each frame and stretched each canvas herself. She then applies watered-down acrylic paint in layers and allows it to drip and behave how it naturally wants. In this process of building, stretching, and painting Sheppard lets go of her need to be pristine and perfect because memories themselves are often imperfect and rough.

Allison Sheppard is currently a senior at Penn State majoring in Painting and Drawing.

241 HUB-Robeson Center | 814.865.2563 | Contact the HUB-Robeson Galleries