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Past Exhibits

2018

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 4 – 27, 2018

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two- and three-dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community. This annual exhibition provides the young artists an exciting opportunity to share their artwork with the community in a professional setting. 

Jewelry and Puppets by Suzanne Nugent

Display Cases
January 15 – March 15, 2018

 

As a child Suzanne Nugent was infatuated by windup music boxes where opening the drawer causes an articulated figure, most commonly a ballerina or clown, to start joyfully dancing. As an adult, she discovered Victorian sand automation toys that instead of using a windup mechanism, work by flipping the box 180 degrees so that the sand runs down and directly animates the figures. Her love of these simple music box automata significantly influence her paper puppets, which she makes entirely by hand using acid-free watercolor paper. 

Nugent’s interest in jewelry making is much more recent, beginning with buying a Shrinky Dink craft kit for her kids in early 2017. While her daughters were working on their own shrunken crafts, Nugent discovered that she could make serious pieces that she could wear herself. Since then she’s created numerous designs, incorporating her own drawings and experimenting with metallic foils and resin. Around the same time that she began making jewelry, Nugent was battling granulomatous mastitis, a rare breast autoimmune disease. The disease opened her eyes to the world of other autoimmune diseases which in turn inspired much of the blue and purple butterfly jewelry designs that honor thyroid and lupus diseases.

Pigs, Process, Sustainability — Maria Lupo

Display Cases
January 15 – March 15, 2018

 

Maria Lupo’s work is rooted in the ecological cycles of nature and one’s relationship to the natural world. The images evoke a mythopoetic relationship with nature that expresses places and creatures both real and imagined. Through the use of tactile, natural materials such as grass seed, spanish moss, topsoil, and feathers the artwork fuses ecology and mythology bearing witness to nature’s power as well as its vulnerability. 

Lupo begins her process by searching through dollar stores, toy departments, and garage sales, a process that she likens to a treasure hunt. Searching through materials starts her organic and fluid artistic process, and as she finds just the right body and nose pairing she begins mixing her topsoil and developing a name, personality, and images for her mythical creature. 

Maria Lupo was born and raised in Newark, NJ and received her BFA from Rutgers University. As part of her studies at Rutgers University, Lupo began her sculptural studies in Cennina, Italy. She continued her studies in Sculpture at Hunter College, CUNY, receiving a Master’s of Fine Arts degree. In addition to her studies as a fine artist, Lupo has completed her Post-Masters Specialization in Art Therapy from Caldwell College and is a Registered Art Therapist, holding a second Masters Degree in Counseling Psychology. Currently, she is a Doctoral Candidate in Medical Humanities at Drew University. 

Jeanne McKinney

Art on the Move — Old Main
January 18 – June 18, 2018

 

“I feel blessed to live in such a beautiful area, surrounded by mountains to explore, streams and rivers to fish, and an abundant source of inspiring landscape to paint. I hope to interpret my work, for others, that which moves me when I view the land.”

Natural elements, such as the soothing sound of a waterfall, the smell of a field of freshly baled hay, or the feel of a rocky climb, trigger Jeanne McKinney’s desire to capture their spirit in a painted image. By working directly outdoors, she not only paints the landscape, but becomes a real part of the landscape thus allowing her to express a more authentic and honest interpretation. 

 McKinney begins her artistic process by developing several studies followed by a gestural drawing in nupastel with a turpenoid wash. A variety of soft pastels are applied loosely over the under paintings working from the general to the specific. She often works with a limited palette of pastels to bring cohesiveness to a painting. 

Jeanne McKinney is a Penn State alumna and currently resides in the State College area. She is a member of several local and national professional artist groups and has studied painting workshops with numerous Juried Associate Members of the Pastel Society of America. McKinney has exhibited her paintings in juried national and regional exhibitions, and her work can be found locally at The State College Framing Company and Gallery, The Green Drake Gallery and Arts Center, and the Gallery Shop in Lemont, Pennsylvania. 

John McKaig: Drawing and Prints

HUB Gallery
January 22 – March 1, 2018

 

For John McKaig, the simple act of slowing down and putting marks on a surface becomes a perfect blend of abstract and layered thought on one hand, and practical action on the other, in a way that connects him to the first primal human actions. 

By using symbols and images and giving them a new context, McKaig transforms them into a series of personal symbols describing layers of different “worlds” in order to depict his shifting identity that comes with the passage of time, his reflection of his identity and existential meaning, and to relate his experience to memories of specific events that defined him. He also layers and re-contextualizes formal elements as part of his exploration of how queer theory informs his work and his life; McKaig rejects the dominant standards in life and in imagery, and hopes that his re-contextualization of objects alludes to his exploration of his queer identity. Very often, McKaig doesn’t begin with a complete plan as to how the many layers of his works will affect each other, but takes an approach similar to that common in improvisational jazz, where he attempts to make them function on individual levels as well as in conduction with the other components. 

The nautical imagery and objects that are so prevalent in his works are McKaig’s way of exploring the idea of passage through life, the idea of always being either “outward or homeward bound,” as the nautical saying goes, and to explore the idea of escape towards a potentially invigorating but perilous situation, as happens in an active life. By incorporating theatrical elements he poetically gives emphasis or inserts misdirection, such as an element appearing both as a background and a significant component, in order to allude to a dual identity or different time relationships.

Depicting recognizable objects, spaces, and figurative elements allows McKaig to maintain a straight-forward connection to the viewers’ experiences. Because of his disdain for irony and cynicism, he endeavors to make his work approachable, but with the hope and expectation that it should be observed carefully and with contemplation. To that end, McKaig goes where his ideas take him, pushing aside ideas of over-analysis or cynicism, and exploring how to communicate a thematic approach in his work, often shifting to different media in order to explore how the inherent qualities of that media can allow him to make the viewer understand a richer connection between all the images.

Spilled Milk — Elise Warfield

Art Alley
January 22 – March 12, 2018

 

Elise Warfield’s painted scenes, rendered in a melange of painterly styles, are an amalgam of quotidian iconography held together by perspectives that don’t quite match. Set in a place that doesn’t shy away from being a lie, her paintings are slightly surreal but alluring enough that we might wish they were true. By filling her paintings with layered symbolism, Warfield creates an ever-elusive and constantly-transforming meaning, leaving nothing to grasp and creating a dizzying descent that provokes uneasy undercurrents beneath the idealistic suburban dream. This is a familiar place turned unpredictable: home doesn’t make sense anymore. 

Elise Warfield is currently a senior at Penn State majoring in Drawing & Painting. She has been awarded the Margaret Griffen Schoenfelder Memorial Scholarship, the Margaret Ellen Gray Trustee Scholarship, and the William J. and Lois Kesterson Leight Scholarship. Warfield has shown her work in several solo and group exhibitions in the State College area and has been published in the winter issue of Studio Visit and the 2017 print edition of Kalliope.

Lydia Walton

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
January 25 – April 27, 2018

 

There’s something fascinating about a group of friends having a conversation. The subtle flicks of fingers and matching rise and fall of voices, the undulation of the crowd. Lydia Walton draws those moments; the lounging, the talking, the tilt of a chair’s legs leaned too far away from the ground. She brings those people into her imagination, separates them from their flawed reality, and lets them spill onto the page, altered to fit a strange world of her design that features similarly altered busses, streets, buildings, and other everyday environments. Walton’s work seeks to explore pervasive themes in popular entertainment as well as the effect of popular media on social interaction. 

Lydia Walton is currently a senior at Penn State majoring in Painting and Drawing. 

Claire Picard

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
January 29 – May 2, 2018

 

In this series of paintings, Claire Picard uses her experience of growing up in a structured community to illustrate the struggles of childhood. Through her use of androgynous figures and conflicting environments, Picard explores the issues of authority, body image, gender and sexuality. Common scenes of childhood and uncanny experiences are used to create deceptively creepy paintings that leave viewers with an internal struggle.

Claire Picard grew up New Canaan, Connecticut, where she started painting at a young age. Picard is an active member of the SOVA community and is currently double-majoring in Art Education and Painting and Drawing at Penn State. Presently, she is working on her Schreyer Honors Thesis investigating STEM curriculum. Picard will be hosting her first solo show in early January, involving a series of oil paintings and watercolor studies.

Remembered — Allison Sheppard

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
January 31 – April 30, 2018

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
May 18 – September 14, 2018

 

In this series of paintings, Allison Sheppard focused on capturing familiar spaces; overlaying the real spaces of her childhood home with her memories of the space, focusing on what she remembers most.

In order to strengthen her personal connections to each painting, Sheppard built each frame and stretched each canvas herself. She then applies watered-down acrylic paint in layers and allows it to drip and behave how it naturally wants. In this process of building, stretching, and painting Sheppard lets go of her need to be pristine and perfect because memories themselves are often imperfect and rough. 

Allison Sheppard is currently a senior at Penn State majoring in Painting and Drawing.

Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania — Annual Juried Exhibition Celebrating 50 Years

Robeson Gallery
February 27 – April 27, 2018

 

This juried exhibition celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania and showcases the work of our area’s many talented artists. This year’s juror is B. Stephen Carpenter II, Professor of Art Education and African American Studies; Co-Director of the Summer Institute on Contemporary Art (SICA); and Chief Executive Artist for Reservoir Studio at Penn State. 

Founded in 1968, the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania is a nonprofit organization that exists to serve students, artists, and the art-loving public in Pennsylvania’s Centre County, the adjacent counties, and beyond. The Art Alliance builds bridges between teachers and art students of all ages and actively encourages community members to become involved  in diverse and ever-changing art experiences. For more information on the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania, please visit their website at artalliancepa.org.

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 23 – April 22, 2018

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to display their work in a professional setting. Visual Arts students will exhibit artwork in a variety of media, based on their in-progress work towards their thesis portfolio. 

The Annual Graduate Research Exhibition celebrates research in all its aspects as an essential and exciting part of graduate education at Penn State. Established in 1986, the Graduate Exhibition places special emphasis on communicating research and creative endeavor to a general audience and offers an opportunity for professional development by challenging graduate students to present their work in clear, comprehensible terms to people outside their fields. 

Penn State Center for Arts & Crafts Annual Artists and Instructors Exhibition

Art Alley, Display Cases
March 30 – April 29, 2018

 

For more than 40 years the Center for Arts and Crafts has provided quality programs and services for the ever-changing social, educational and recreational needs of the Centre County Community.  Their main office and classrooms are located in Ritenour Building at the corner of Pollock and Shortlidge Roads, and the Ceramics Studio is located in the HUB-Robeson Center. 

The Center for Arts and Crafts offers a variety of non-credit adult art classes during Fall and Spring semesters, and children’s art camps in the summer.  All classes are taught by Penn State University Art majors, Art Education majors, graduate students and professional artists.

Lindsey Kircher

Art on the Move — Old Main
May 4  – September 21, 2018

Through abstraction of figure and space, Lindsey Kircher investigates the absurdity inherent to the social experiences of young adulthood and how she finds her place within them. Using simplified form as a tool, Kircher revisits memories and captures their generalized essence. Though these paintings are about her own life experiences, they access a greater exploration of human community and the individual's role within it. 

Lindsey Kircher is a senior Penn State Schreyer Honors scholar pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree and minors in Spanish and Arts Entrepreneurship.

A→CHROMATIC: Drawings and Prints, 2013 – 2018

HUB Gallery
May 29 – July 28, 2018

 

A→CHROMATIC represents a comprehensive overview of painter J. Harlan Ritchey’s artistic development and coincides with the 5-year anniversary of his introduction to the gallery world. 

The subject matter of A→CHROMATIC can be divided into four broad genres: landscape, still life, floral, and abstract. Within each of these genres, Ritchey works to explore specific themes and emphasize the elements that he considers to be most conducive to those themes. In the landscape genre, those themes are a connection to perspective and place while the floral genre explores a connection to rhythm and color; the still life genre emphasizes a connection to composition and form, and the abstract genre’s theme focuses on a connection to pattern and theory. Each image carries a range of art-historical, cultural, and biographical influences but invites the viewer to arrive at their own aesthetic or critical judgments.

J. Harlan Ritchey received his BA in Filmmaking from Penn State in 1999, with Honors in Visual Arts. He is a self-taught artist and has for the past several years done fine art and illustration commissions for a range of local and national clients. Ritchey’s first public exhibition was in 2013, and in 2015 he began teaching art classes. He currently lives and works in State College, PA.

Manual Labor — Jo Margolis & Kate McGraw

Robeson Gallery
June 5 – August 24, 2018

Kindred methodologies in mark-making techniques and appreciation for agricultural spaces bring artists Jo Margolis and Kate McGraw into the fold of artistic collaboration and formal discussion. Exacting and rigorous, each artist employs their astute sense of agency by using simple tools to mark the surface of their chosen material - paper, stone, wood or wall – while consciously allowing for the drawn forms to grow organically. Over the course of many rigorous drawing sessions, these hallowed surfaces become enveloped with careful inscriptions, serving as documents of time – evocative of sacred texts, or illuminated manuscripts.

 

“I am fascinated by the essence of calligraphic shapes and sacred texts.  Some of my latest work focuses on forms that emerge, the softness of clarity until we know what it is becoming. There is something in unknowing that is both humbling and hopeful.”

 – Jo Margolis

 

Margolis and McGraw find comradery and appreciation for agricultural life and their local landscapes of Southcentral Pennsylvania that inform their sense of place and home. As a farmer tends to the land, each artist toils over surfaces with pen, graphite, crayon or pencil in earnest cultivation. The direct action of drawing tools meeting surface is the performance and vehicle for manifestation. Experiencing the artistic process as meditative labor is an essential component to the artists’ work. Intentions transmute into textural surface planes, meandering departures and connections, and floating tapestries that consider the void in space, as well as the occupied. 

 

“My most recent work honors the infusion of light and spectrum as the vehicle for expansion and ascension. My studio, as it stands today, is a makeshift time machine and incubator space for off-site projects, installations and performances, paintings and drawings, sites and shiny objects.” 

– Kate McGraw 

 

Margolis and McGraw combine austere, monastic minimalism with the whimsical and enchanted to create atmospheres for contemplation and reflection, as well as metamorphosis and expansion. Both artists were born and raised in Southcentral Pennsylvania. Jo Margolis lives and works in Wellsville in York County and Kate McGraw lives and works in Boiling Springs, Cumberland County. Margolis earned her BFA and MFA from University of Pennsylvania. McGraw earned her BFA from Penn State and her MFA from Brooklyn College. 

Of Man and Nature — David Moyer

Art Alley
May 14 – September 18, 2018

 

David Moyer’s work begins with his interest in books and the written word, which drives him to look for ways to combine his creative imagery with text. His prints explore visual and literary ideas through drawings and black and white print media. Moyer typically employs the method of wood engraving, which is deeply rooted in the history of the book arts, though he does occasionally incorporate intaglio processes lithography. 

Moyer’s technique stems from his interest in the quality of line, where his ideas are conceived as black lines on a white ground thereby focusing on the graphic quality of wood engraving rather than on the tonal quality. His preference for black-line engraving is driven by his fondness for the German print tradition and the works of Albrecht Durer, Michael Wolgemut, Lucas Cranach, Hans Holbein, and Hans Baldung Grein.

In 1988 Moyer and his wife Gretchen founded Red Howler Press in order to print handmade, limited-edition fine press and artist books. All of the books from Red Howler Press carry a message — sometimes serious, sometimes playful — but it is primarily the visual imagery that is the primary communicator in these pressed works. Moyer’s Red Howler Press books are housed in numerous libraries across the United States, Canada, and Europe.

Currently, David Moyer is an Assistant Professor of Graphic Design at Penn College of Technology. He earned his MFA from the Maryland Institute College of Art and his BFA from the University of Delaware. Moyer has exhibited extensively throughout the United States and Internationally, and is a member of The Society of Wood Engravers, The Wood Engravers Network, and The Fine Press Book Association. 

2017

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 5 – January 28, 2017

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two— and three—dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community.

He Called Me Sexy Baby…But My Name Is Helen

Art Alley
January 13 – March 2, 2017

 

Helen Maser’s work explores themes and ideas through the lens of Audre Lorde’s popular writings, The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle The Master’s House (1984). In using this framework of dismantling the master’s house, Maser uses art as a tool to speak about pressing issues and combat the patriarchy. For her, the “personal becomes political” as a form of resistance.

Through her development of memory, language, and facilitation of difficult content and conversations, Maser works in the gap of underrepresented and often silenced issues. By using imagery of self-portraiture, pipes, and sites of home improvement stores, her intertwining of rope, blurring of paint, and her resistant gaze counter not only her experiences, but reframe trauma and violence into empowerment and self-autonomy. In moments where representation turns into abstraction, she obtains liberty from the past and reclaims her own body.

Helen Maser is originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and currently resides in State College where she is a student at Penn State working towards her Bachelor of Fine Arts in both Painting and Sculpture. Over the past four years, Maser has shown her work in several exhibitions in the State College area. She has also been awarded the Brian Bretzler Memorial Award in Visual Arts, and in 2016 was winner of Rough Intent, an exhibition juried by Richard Reinhart.

Harriet M. Rosenberg: A Retrospective of Cut Paper

HUB Gallery
January 19 – March 2, 2017

 

Armed with her favorite pairs of scissors, a pair of 4” hair cutting scissors and fly-tying scissors with large finger holes, Rosenberg transforms paper and other easily-cut materials into intricate and versatile designs. In addition to being displayed as originals, her paper cuts have also been used as stencils, screen printed onto recycled clothing, projected as part of theatrical sets, and used as the design for the State College Women’s Resource Center’s holiday cards since the 1990s.

Rosenberg finds inspiration in the Lake Country where she grew up, her Finnish heritage, her travels, and the literature, music, and folk arts that she loves. While her cutting style is her own, it is more closely related to Mexican “papel picado” and Finnish and Inuit carving and printmaking than the traditional European “scherenschnitte” that is most commonly associated with paper cutting.

Rosenberg began to cut paper artistically in her 40’s. Making art from scissors and paper had already been familiar to her at a young age, due to her father’s job at a paper company and her affinity for cutting her own paper dolls. But it wasn’t until after her formal education; a degree in Music and English from St. Olaf College in Northfield Minnesota, a Masters of Education in Human Development from Penn State, and a partial degree in Theatre and additional classes in photography and printmaking, that she arrived back where she began — cutting paper.

She recalls, “When I began to carry paper and scissors in my purse, years ago, I realized that I had found my medium at last.”

Misty Frederick-Ritz

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
February 1 – May 5, 2017

 

Misty Frederick-Ritz is a painter, jewelry maker, mixed media artist, and digital artist from State College, Pennsylvania. She has a passion for color and texture and loves spending time in her studio. She primarily works with acrylics, water colors, water soluble crayons, inks, polymer clay, beads and buttons, fabrics and fibers, and colored pencils. Frederick-Ritz’s recent works, painted in a style known as “contemporary symbolism,” best represent her as a creative and spiritual person. Frequently featuring a feminine archetype, her paintings are an “outer” representation of her “inner” self.

Frederick-Ritz has shown her work in various locations in Central Pennsylvania and is a certified “Color of Woman” teacher. She offers individual and group classes on painting, art journaling, and mixed media and creates opportunities for Central Pennsylvania women and girls to come together in groups and workshops providing community, connection, thought-provoking discussions, and activities that foster personal growth & self-discovery. Her goal is to spark creativity in others and to provide a positive and encouraging environment to help others learn to express themselves through art and writing.

Black Lives Matter — Aaron Maybin

Robeson Gallery
February 16 – April 28, 2017

 

Aaron Maybin is a retired professional football player turned artist. After retiring from the NFL in 2014, he turned his focus towards his talent for art. His paintings, photography, and writings focus on socially relevant themes and issues, including the struggle of African-Americans to be seen not just as equals but as human beings, deserving of respect and basic dignity. Maybin’s work is representative of that struggle and serves as a platform to start difficult conversations, with the hope that it can bring people from opposing sides of the spectrum together and spark important conversations that may otherwise not happen. “Art serves as a bridge between people of different backgrounds, religions, sexuality, and economic class. Such a tool is essential in the fight to break down the many social, cultural, and political barriers that divide us and bring us all to a place where we can find a true common ground in reason,” Maybin says.

While his work focuses on themes and issues that may not be positive themselves, he always begins a new piece by questioning how the messages will positively affect viewers and the community. By keeping this positive focus, Maybin is able to use his work to advocate for the issues that are important to him: racial and economic equality, arts education, and programming in underprivileged communities. Larry “Poncho” Brown, Maybin’s artistic mentor, has described his vibrant depictions of inspirations, racial strife, and communal love, hope, and disappointment as “a mix of good technical ability, ‘hip-hop flair,’ and a probing desire to depict modern black consciousness.”

Aaron Maybin is a former All-American defensive end from Penn State, where he double-majored in Communications and Integrative Arts. He was drafted by the Buffalo Bills as 11th overall pick in the 2009 NFL draft and went on to play for the New York Jets and the Cincinnati Bengals before retiring from football in 2014. In 2009 he started Project Mayhem, a nonprofit foundation that provides personal and economic aid to underprivileged and at-risk youth so that they can excel beyond their current conditions.

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 24 – April 23, 2017

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to display their work in a professional setting. Visual Arts students will exhibit artwork in a variety of media, based on their in-progress work towards their thesis portfolio.

The Annual Graduate Research Exhibition celebrates research in all its aspects as an essential and exciting part of graduate education at Penn State. Established in 1986, the Graduate Exhibition places special emphasis on communicating research and creative endeavor to a general audience and offers an opportunity for professional development by challenging graduate students to present their work in clear, comprehensible terms to people outside their fields.

Penn State Center for Arts & Crafts Annual Artists and Instructors Exhibition

Art Alley, Display Cases
March 24 – April 30, 2017

 

This exhibit will feature two- and three-dimensional artwork in media and disciplines representing the range of art classes available at the Center for Arts & Crafts. For more than 40 years the Center for Arts & Crafts has provided quality programs and services for the ever-changing social, educational, and recreational needs of the Centre County Community. Their main office and classrooms are located in Ritenour Building at the corner of Pollock and Shortlidge Roads, and the Ceramics Studio is located in the HUB-Robeson Center.

The Center for Arts & Crafts offers a variety of non-credit adult art classes during Fall and Spring semesters, and children’s art camp in the summer. All classes are taught by Penn State University Art majors, Art Education majors, graduate students, and professional artists.

In Time of Peace: Images of Syria Before the War — Keith Shapiro

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
April 28 – September 10, 2017

 

During the mid-90s, Keith Shapiro traveled extensively, mostly by hitching rides, through Syria and Jordan where he experienced a uniquely warm welcome from strangers who acted with the affect and hospitality of friends. Despite this, he sensed a feeling of sadness and anticipation that the peace they were then experiencing was ephemeral and aimed to capture that feeling through his photography. Unfortunately, their fears about the fragility of peace were right. Much of what Shapiro saw, and some of the people he met, have been destroyed by the recent war. These photographs are a glimpse of his experience, reflecting the mixed emotions he felt then and the sadness he feels now for a rich and ancient civilization driven into despair and chaos.

Contemporary Chinese Posters

HUB Gallery
May 10 – June 18, 2017

 

Gang Meng, Cheng Shi, and Bingyan Xue are three Nanjing graphic designers who are all well-versed in contemporary Chinese poster design and are dedicated to modernizing traditional Chinese culture in graphic design. This exhibition features a selection of their recent and daring works, in which they experiment with the shape of Chinese characters and push the boundary of Chinese type design to embody the expressive, nostalgic, and impressionistic feelings of the characters.

Gang Meng is a Penn State visiting scholar from Nanjing Tech University, Jiangsu Province, China. He has published and lectured internationally in multi-disciplinary design including, but not limited to: visual communications, packaging, advertising, computer graphics, and designing modules. Meng focuses on culture-based design, user analysis, and modernization of traditional design and has participated in several research projects including: City Image Design, Corporation Image Design, and several other provincial and school level projects.

Fernanda Bonafini

Art on the Move – Old Main
May 12 – September 17, 2017

 

Fernanda Bonafini first began drawing mandalas as a way to relieve stress and balance emotions. Her first mandalas were drawn on black paper with gel pens and she later migrated to using black ink pens on white paper. More recently, she has begun working with heat transfer to add various colors of reflective foil to her original black ink mandalas.

The term mandala means “circle” in Sanskrit, however mandalas are much more than just circles to her; they also represent wholeness and inner peace. Even Ataraxiaowl, her chosen artistic name, synthesizes the message she wants to convey in her drawings, as Ataraxia means “a lucid state of robust tranquility and ongoing freedom from distress and worry,” while owl represents wisdom and the ability to navigate any darkness in life.

Bonafini draws inspiration from other contemporary mandala artists, her personal journey towards self-knowledge and self-awareness, and her affinity for geometry and symmetry. She hopes that her work can help others improve concentration, increase creativity, decrease anxiety and stress, and increase physical and emotional balance.

Fernanda Bonafini is currently a student at Penn State earning her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction — Mathematics Education and a concurrent Masters degree in Applied Statistics.

Beverly Klucher

Art on the Move — Old Main
May 12, 2017 – January 17, 2018

 

Beverly Klucher is a prolific oil painter whose primary focus is on costal scenes and landscapes. Her paintings have been exhibited extensively throughout the Eastern United States and sold to private & Corporate collectors. Many of her pastoral scenes are reflective of the Central Pennsylvania region, while many of her beach scenes are captured while on her annual trip to Cape Cod, Florida. Regardless of the scene, the fluidity of light combined with the spontaneity of her brush strokes depicts a sense of calm in the moment.

As the daughter of a Naval officer, Klucher was blessed with the opportunity to travel extensively as a child. She quickly realized that she could visually communicate her experiences with pencil and chalk. Her talent was obvious to those around her and soon Klucher realized the importance of pursuing her love of art.

Beverly Klucher is a Fine Arts graduate of Pennsylvania State University and has completed further graduate work in Landscape Painting at Maryland Institute of Art. She and her husband currently reside in the State College area where they both appreciate the sweeping views of the Appalachian Mountains.

Getting My Way and Whining About It — Miranda Holmes

Art Alley
May 19 – September 7, 2017

 

As we move through everyday life amidst political uncertainty and fear, we search for the broken parts to reveal where we went wrong. Miranda Holmes’ work enters into this conversation through the ambiguous nature of her paintings’ narratives as well as their underlying feelings of unsettledness. By using sickly high-key colors and foggy darks to poke fun at both the absurdity of our gaffes and the dread of our more cutting mistakes, Holmes’ work addresses the culpability of human actions. She creates a sense of ambiguity in her paintings by leaving out certain clues which allows the viewer to pass judgement on where the scene went wrong.

Providing contrast to the underlying violence and irony are a variety of quieter moments, found in the form of fog-ridden trees, the glow of a campfire, or a muscular rock. These shifts between moments of clarity and hope to areas of obscurity and despair are representative of her reactions to the daily uncertainty Holmes faces as she struggles to make sense of the swift changes in her world.

Miranda Holmes is a State College native and a recent graduate of Penn State, where she earned her BFA in Painting and Drawing. She has shown her work in several exhibitions in the State College area, including the HUB-Robeson Galleries’ Art on the Move program in 2016. She was awarded the Ellen Battell Stoeckel Fellowship to attend the Yale Summer School of Art in Norfolk, Connecticut in 2016.

The Art & History of Bicycles

Robeson Gallery
June 11 – September 7, 2017

 

Featuring a variety of historical and novelty bicycles from the collection of Bob Swaim, artists Thomas Fainor, Ben Bowden, Kerry McLean, Eric Staller, and Tommmi Miller take the viewer on a two-wheeled tour of the art and history of bicycles.

Thomas Fainor, a wood and metal artist with a very strong mechanical nature and background, begins the historical aspect of The Art & History of Bicycles with his reproductions of a Hobby Horse and Boneshaker. These are followed chronologically by an unknown artist who created the Highwheeler, or Pennyfarthing, and an early Safety Bicycle, which was the precursor to bicycles as we know them today.

Ben Bowden, a British industrial designer, bridges the gap between art and history with his Bowden Spacelander. The Spacelander, when originally released in 1960, was initially considered commercially unsuccessful until the 1980s when a resurgence of interest in the Spacelander as a collectors item led two bicycle enthusiasts to purchase the rights to the name and began manufacturing reproductions.

Kerry McLean is most famous for his design, production, and use of monocycles, which are large, one-wheeled vehicles that the rider sits inside of. Accompanying the Human Powered Monocycle in this exhibit are two one-of-a-kid creations by McLean: a low-rider bicycle and a whole-body tricycle.

Eric Staller is an American artist who uses light and architecture in the creation of his works. He is considered to be one of the pioneers of the Art Car Movement with his 7-person Conference Bike and Love Bike Built for Two.

Tommmi Miller is an American artist from Indiana who creates artistically unique bicycles that are then used by performers. Even though Miller’s passion is for unicycles, evident in his Triple-Wheeled Unicycle, he has also created the Off-Centered Wheel Bicycle, a One-of-a-kind Tricycle, and Reverse Steering Kits for bicycles.

Bob Swaim’s collection of unique human-powered vehicles began with he first saw Tommmi Miller traveling in an old school bus to display his units at a bicycle convention in Iowa in the 1990s. Swaim’s first unique unit came from Miller, and his collection has since grown to include over 200 pieces from a variety of artists. Inspired by Miller, Swaim travels with his bikes in a 24-foot trailer to display subsets of his collection at various events, museums, and schools.

Embroidered Environments — Amanda McCavour

HUB Gallery
June 30 – September 12, 2017

 

Amanda McCavour works with stitch to create large-scale embroidered installations. By sewing into fabric that dissolves in water, she can build up stitched lines on a temporary surface. While sewing, she crosses the threads over themselves repeatedly so that after the fabric has dissolved, the thread drawing can hold itself together despite appearing as though it could easily unravel and fall apart at any moment.

McCavour is interested in thread’s assumed vulnerability, its ability to unravel, and its strength when sewn together. Her works explore embroidery’s duality: its structural possibility vs. its fragility and its subtle quality vs. its accumulative presence. Through experimentation and creation, she investigates line in the context of embroidery, drawing and installation, and uses stitch to explore connections to home, fibers of the body, and more formal considerations of thread’s accumulative presence.

Amanda McCavour earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts from York University where she studied drawing and, in May 2014, completed her Master of Fine Arts in Fibers and Materials Studies at Tyler School of Art. She displays her work nationally and internationally, most recently in Ottawa, Virginia Beach, and Vancouver, and has recently completed residencies at Harbourfront Centre’s Textiles Studio in Toronto, Maison des Metiers D’art de Quebec in Quebec City, and the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture in Dawson City, Yukon. McCavour has received numerous awards and scholarships from The Canada Council for the Arts, The Handweavers and Spinners Guild of America, The Ontario Crafts Council, The Ontario Society of Artists, The Surface Design Association, and The Embroiderers Guild of America.

For more information on Amanda McCavour, visit her on Facebook or Instagram.

Prince Spells

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
September 11, 2017 – January 15, 2018

 

As a photographer, Prince Spells finds that his purpose is to photograph and publish issues of civic concern in the interest of informing and educating the public. He came away from his travels in Africa with a concept that is not just specific to that part of the world, focusing on the universal themes of struggle, poverty, resilience, and the human determination to survive. He explains that “It is a utilitarian philosophy characterized by rebellion, survival, utility, and competition within a hostile environment…I believe that evidence for this concept can be found right here in the ghettos of America.”

Prince Spells was born and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He’s a 2008 graduate of Penn State, where he majored in Integrative Arts. Since then, inspired by the ideology of civic journalism, Spells has focused exclusively on subsistence enterprise issues; producing photo-essays in China, Italy, and the U.S. in the interest of building the foundation for The Partnering Firm, a non-profit organization that serves the public interest by stimulating the artistic and entrepreneurial agency of independent workers, worldwide, through innovative initiatives that perpetuate the mutual improvement of society.

Jake Waldman

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
September 18, 2017 – January 22, 2018

 

Jake Waldman first became intrigued by trains and railroads when watching the locomotives on the Hudson River near where he grew up. These photographs were all shot with a K-1000 Single Lens Reflex (S.L.R.) Camera, and many were taken onboard as a passenger en route to Florida and California. He states, “After a few rides on steam trains I was sold on the big, fire-breathing machine…the smell of the coal, the wisps of water vapor, the vibration of the ground, and the fluid movement of so many tons of steel, fire, and water.”

Waldman graduated from the Eberly College of Science in 2004 with an MS in Chemistry and has since worked in the pharmaceutical industry as a process chemist. He has always been interested in photography and received his first Single Lens Reflex camera in 1991. Even though he now uses a digital S.L.R., Waldman still applies his knowledge of F-stops, shutter speed, and manual focus to inform his photography.

Lindsey Duffey

Art on the Move — Old Main
September 18, 2017 – April 30, 2018

 

Lindsey Duffey’s photographs highlight the details of everyday objects that might otherwise go unnoticed or unappreciated. This series focuses specifically on unique bicycles from the collection of Bob “The Bike Guy” Swaim. She intentionally composed each photograph so that the viewer’s attention is directed towards a single, small component removing the context of the overall object. Duffey does this as a way of inviting the viewer to look at the bikes beyond their purpose as a form of transportation and begin looking at them as pieces of art.

Lindsey Duffey earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Applied Media Arts from Edinboro University in 2012 and currently resides in the State College area.

Playthings of a Bygone Era

Display Cases
September 19, 2017 – January 5, 2018

 

“The aesthetics of the past and the beauty in everyday objects is something that has always fascinated me,” collector Brian Smith says. “Children’s books and toys can offer a glimpse into the past, allowing the viewer to transport back to a time when we were more youthful than we are today. There is an air of reminiscence about old toys and books, a sense of wonderment and nostalgia; however, these Playthings of a Bygone Era can also offer a more ‘proper’ purpose. One can learn a lot about the past through the writings of ‘great’ men and women. The actions of those in positions of power, and the ones who challenge that power, frequently turn up in history textbooks. But I believe that a person can learn a lot about the past through an appreciation of how a culture spends its leisure time. The toys that we play with, the stories that we read as children and the illustrations that we pour over as the book is being read to us can speak to the larger question of who we are as a society.”

Brian Smith was born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He currently resides in State College with his wife and two sons and is a Social Studies teacher with the State College Area High School.

Empathy and Entropy — Mary Cate Fruehan

Display Cases
September 19, 2017 – January 5, 2018

 

Growing up in rural Pennsylvania, Mary Cate Fruehan found herself intrigued by decay in the form of dilapidated houses or rusted-out cars. These ruins felt monumental and mystical to her, leaving her with a feeling of wonder not knowing their stories or who they belonged to. In a time where information is at our fingertips, wanting for more can be poignant. Fruehan’s work plays into this element of wanting more information by implying a function or narrative but with an unknown or incomplete use.

In her studio practice Fruehan begins by incrementally laying down material, allowing the forms to evolve slowly and suggest narratives of how they might work. As she negotiates with her materials and navigates these forms, their emerging logic suggests where an orifice should be, how something might navigate the interior of this space, or how this object could function.

Mary Cate Fruehan recently received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Penn State with a concentration in Ceramics. She has further studied sculpture and ceramics at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts and Arrowmount School of Arts and Crafts. In Fall 2017 she will be student teaching in Pittsburgh and completing her degree in Art Education.

Bradley Klem

Display Cases
September 19, 2017 – January 5, 2018

 

Bradley Klem uses illustration in his work to express ideas about conservation and sustainability. Many of his ideas were developed through sharing experiences with his father both while fishing and in the mountains of Northern Arizona. He pairs this imagery with handmade pottery in order to exploit its familiarity and utilize the relationship we have with objects that inhabit our everyday lives. The illustrations then become part of the overall experience with these objects and possibly add to the conversations which may take place around them.

Bradley Klem lived much of his life in Arizona and was first introduced to clay while studying painting at Arizona State University. Since completing his undergraduate degree in 2014, Klem has been regularly exhibiting his work in national and international exhibitions as well as hosting workshops and presentations across the United States. In 2015 he partnered with Alexandra Jelleberg to co-found, coordinate, and direct GrowlerFest 2015 East and West. As a founding director of GrowlerFest it is his aim to emphasize the link between the craft brewery movement and the vitality of handmade pottery. Klem is currently a Master of Fine Arts candidate in Ceramics at Penn State.

Animal Mandalas by Fernanda Bonafini

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
September 20, 2017 – January 17, 2018

 

Much of Fernanda Bonafini’s early work was on black paper with gel pens and white paper with black ink pens but more recently she has incorporated hand drawing digital media into her work, using an Apple pencil with an iPad Pro. All of the creations presented in this exhibition are part of an larger series of polygonal animal drawings that combine the beauty of animals, the simplicity of polygonal shapes , and the intricate details of mandalas.

Bonafini draws inspiration from other contemporary mandala artists, her personal journey towards self-knowledge and self-awareness, and her affinity for geometry and symmetry. She hopes that her work can help others improve concentration, increase creativity, decrease anxiety and stress, and increase physical and emotional balance.

Fernanda Bonafini is currently a student at Penn State earning her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction — Mathematics Education and a concurrent Masters degree in Applied Statistics.

Romanticism and the Theatre of Everyday Living — Erica Harney

HUB Gallery
September 27 – December 10, 2017

 

Erica Harney’s paintings reside in the interstices of realism and abstraction. They’re about the act of creating “selective” realities, which can be literal, like the exquisitely intentional fabrications of staged theaters, or existential like the self-images we craft in an effort to help us perceive and be perceived by others. By exploiting the deceptive nature of paint, she allows remnants of the physical and intellectual process to emphasize that the images are an artifice — deliberately constructed, edited, and presented in such a way as to become its own entity.

Harney’s work is directly affected by her experiences working as a scenic artist, painting sets and backdrops for operas, plays, and musicals, where every element of the set has been carefully and deliberately chosen to express a mood, idea, or ambience. Even the word “play” has a significant double meaning to her as playfulness and whimsy propel her work and allow each piece to take on its own aesthetic and identity that is completely different from the one before.

Erica Harney is a Philadelphia-based painter who holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Alfred University and a Master of Fine Arts from Penn State. She has also studied at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence, Italy and has been a resident artist at ArtScape in Toronto, Weir Farm in Connecticut, the Palazzo Rinaldi Italy, and the Vermont Studio Center. She has exhibited extensively across the United States and Internationally, and has been the recipient of numerous awards, including a Graham Endowed Fellowship, a Daniel J. Murphy II Award for Creativity, and a Christos N. Apostle Grant.

Since 2012 Harney has worked professionally as a scenic painter for Philadelphia-area theatre and production companies, including Opera Philadelphia and Opera Delaware. She is currently the Scenic Charge at the Fulton Scenic Studios, the official production company for the historic Fulton Opera House in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Pre-Sentimental — Matthew Hall

Art Alley
September 29 – December 10, 2017

 

Matthew Hall developed this body of work through the experience of adopting a new city, building a home, and what continues to resonate after it no longer feels new. The imagery and scenes are a meditation on how affinity builds attachment and the comfort derived from that sentimentality.

Hall is a Philadelphia-based artist working with gestural drawing, books, text, and works on paper. He earned his Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking from Penn State in 2013 and his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Ceramics from Alfred University in 2006. His work was named “Best in Show” in 2012 by juror Brook Seidlemann in Homage: Past Influences at the Target Art Gallery in Alexandria, Virginia. Hall participated in an artist residency at the Vermont Studio Center in June of 2013 and has designed the season graphics for Salt Lake Acting Company from 2010 – 2015. He has been represented by 3rd Street Gallery in Philadelphia since 2014.

School of Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
September 29 – November 16, 2017

 

Visual artists at Penn State see things many of us mostly miss — they take the chance of curiosity and meld it with the obscurity that surrounds us to yield the unpredictable and the spectacular; the playful and the purposeful. Now we see it; now we know it. The many motions of making and the private persuasion of shaping push the limits of material and matter, re-charge technologies of form fitting, re-claim the mysteries of material thinking, re-animate audacious change, and re-vision art as nothing, and as everything else.

On view is work by full-time faculty who teach visual arts and design in School of Visual Arts studios and digital labs as part of their academic and professional practice. Participants include Brian Alfred, John Bowman, Paul Chidester, Bonnie Collura, Robin Gibson, Shannon Goff, Lonnie Graham, Andrew Hieronymi, Tom Lauerman, Cristin Millet, Jerrold Maddox, Eduardo Navas, Helen O’Leary, Liz Quackenbush, Eric Roman, Carlos Rosas, Steven Rubin, Jean Sanders, Keith Shapiro, Rudy Shepherd, Ann Shostrom, Stephanie Snider, Chris Staley, Ann Tarantino, and Robert Yarber.

2016

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 7 – January 23, 2016

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two— and three—dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community.

AAUW State College Centennial Archives Roadshow

Display Cases
January 16 – March 2, 2016

 

The A.A.U.W. State College Centennial Archives Roadshow offers a peak into the fascinating history of the A.A.U.W. State College Branch and includes several photos, handbooks, newspaper clippings, and letters which will be displayed publicly for the first time in the 100-year history of the branch. Formed on February 18, 1916, the Branch advances equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. In the beginning, the Branch worked with Pennsylvania State College to ensure there were athletic fields for women students, restrooms in public buildings, and a woman member on the Pennsylvania State College Board of Trustees. Over the years, Branch members became community mobilizers and leaders. Today, the Branch provides STEM programs for girls in all of the local school districts, raises $100,000+ annually at the A.A.U.W. State College Used Book Sale to provide scholarships for women and help fund dozens of community groups, and has a Penn State student affiliate group.

Miranda Holmes

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
January 20 – May 25, 2016

 

Miranda Holmes’ work is an exploration of White supremacy in the contemporary American household. The over-abundance of food, pleasure, and human listlessness is a vehicle to both make visible and critique White America’s complacency and compliance with racial inequities. Her paintings reflect her curiosity in the ways in which White privilege manifests in her life and in those around her. Through her depictions of sickeningly sugary desserts Holmes is able to portray privilege as enticing and toxic, superficially delicious but deeply damaging.

Holmes’ work also explores sexual desire in relation to power and entitlement. Are our intimate spaces inherently dictated by power imbalances? Is there a space in which bodies can merely exist, or is the definition of Whiteness inseparable from that of the consumer? While her paintings may raise more questions than the answer, Holmes hopes that they will still spark conversations among viewers who dare to examine the daydreams in which they may live.

Miranda Holmes is a State College native. She is a junior at Penn State studying painting and drawing in the Bachelor of Fine Arts program, and is currently studying abroad in Florence, Italy at Studio Art Centers International. She hopes to attend Graduate school to continue her fine arts education.

Coded Language — Nicole Lau

HUB Gallery
January 22 – March 3, 2016

 

Coded Language features sculptural installations by Penn State School of Visual Arts Graduate Student Nicole Lau, and will tackle themes of microaggression, ethnogenesis, and identity politics. Inspired by her own experiences with ambiguous racism and language hiding coded and implied meanings, Lau explores how power, privilege, and oppression are foundations for society. She seeks to explore the institutional oppression that is tightly woven into the fabric of our history and uses her work to identify how oppression is upheld through microaggressions and how one can respond with ethnogenesis. Microaggressions are the subtle ways in which verbal and body language convey oppressive ideology against marginalized identities. Ethnogenesis is a process in which a group of people acquire an identity that signifies them as an ethnic group.

Nicole Lau was born and raised in San Francisco, California. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Visual Arts at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington in 2008, and is currently pursing her Master of Fine Arts with a concentration in Ceramics at Penn State. She is an Americorps Alumni and her work in 2011 with Public Allies/Americorps was a pivotal moment in her art practice, shifting her themes towards identity politics and social justice.

Optics of the Poles — A Visual Expression of Polar Research at Penn State

Art Alley
January 25 – March 6, 2016

 

Optics of the Poles is a exhibit juried by The Polar Center at Penn State Steering Committee and features a wide variety of artwork by Penn State Undergraduate and Graduate students associated with the visual arts. Each artwork is an interpretation and representation of climate change.

The Polar Center fosters creative, ground-breaking collaboration by catalyzing exchange among members with a unique breadth of expertise at Penn State, representing the life, physical, and social sciences. The Center provides a platform for powerfully forward-thinking scientific exchange with other national and international institutions through workshops and conferences focusing on polar science, and with the local community through public events and lectures ultimately communicating the rare beauty and scientific and cultural value of these regions.

John Mangan

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
February 3 – May 3, 2016

 

John Mangan was a Penn State Continuing Education Drawing and Painting Instructor who unfortunately passed away on September 9, 2014. He is remembered as being an incredibly gifted artist with a unique visionary aesthetic. Mangan was an active artist, exhibiting his work frequently at several venues throughout Central Pennsylvania. The paintings on display in this exhibit feature a variety of animals painted on old windows.

Maryanne Fyda

Art on the Move — Old Main
February 4 – May 1, 2016

 

Maryanne Fyda responds to the beauty of objects, people, and places through a variety of mediums, including pencil, pen and ink, watercolor, charcoal, mixed media, and pastels, which are her favorite. She enjoys the entire creative process from start to finish, and lives for the thrill of completing a piece. She is also makes dichroic glass jewelry and is a calligrapher.

Maryanne is a graduate of Wayne State University, where she earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Fine Arts. She now lives in DuBois, Pennsylvania, and runs her own art studio, Marianne Fyda’s Studio, where she offers classes for adults and children in drawing, watercolor, pastel, and calligraphy. Marianne is involved in numerous arts organizations, including the Central Pennsylvania Pastel Society, the Degas Pastel Society, and the Pastel Society of America.

Howie Schultz

Art on the Move — Old Main
February 4 – May 1, 2016

Art on the Move — University Health Services
September 20, 2016 – January 9, 2017

 

Howie Schultz is a sports and landscape photographer from State College, Pennsylvania. Throughout his travels over the past 20 years he has been fortunate to capture powerful images of both iconic destinations and places off of the beaten path. Schultz often leads photography workshops in the State College area for beginner and intermediate photographers.

Alyce Ritti

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
February 9 – May 5, 2016

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
September 13 – December 5, 2016

 

Alyce Ritti is a mixed-media artist who combines paper cutouts, fabric, jewelry, feathers, and other found objects to create her unique and playful collages. Each collage is created with the intention of starting a conversation with the viewer, often laced with social and political commentaries and accompanied by a touch of humor and absurdity.

Art Collectors Grace Hampton and Charles Dumas

Robeson Gallery
February 12 – April 22, 2016

 

Grace Hampton’s collection includes artwork from a wide range of artists from the United States, West Africa, and the African Diaspora. Much of the work in the collection comes from artists she has met during her travels throughout the United States, Europe, and Africa.

Charles Dumas and his wife Jo began collecting artwork 40 years ago. They have accumulated many original works from Africa, Haiti, and the African Diaspora, and they are especially fond of works by local State College and Penn State artists.

Grace Hampton is a Penn State College of Arts and Architecture Professor Emeritus in Art, Art Education, and Integrative Arts. She was also a professor at Northern Illinois University, California State University at Sacramento, and the University of Oregon in Eugene, and from 2002-2003 was a visiting professor at The Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Kumasi Ghana. She was an exhibitor as well as a member of the American Delegation to the Second World Festival of Black and African Arts and Culture in Lagos, Nigeria and in numerous visual arts and jewelry exhibitions in the United States. Although officially retired, Hampton has embarked on her next career as full-time artist and consultant in art education, the integration of the arts, and community development through the arts.

Charles Dumas is a Penn State College of Arts and Architecture Professor Emeritus in the School of Theatre. He was also a professor at Temple University, South Africa’s University of the Free State, State University of New York at New Paltz, and a Fulbright Fellow at Stellenbosch University. Dumas is also a professional writer, actor, director, and producer having appeared in over three hundred professional shows on TV, film, and the live stage. He is a past recipient of a Pennsylvania Council of the Arts Fellowship. He received an Ensemble Emmy for his part in Separate But Equal and a Best Actor Award from the Hollywood/Beverly Hills NAACP for B.C. Historia.

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 28 – April 24, 2016

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to display their work in a professional setting. Visual Arts students will exhibit artwork in a variety of media, based on their in-progress work towards their thesis portfolio.

The Annual Graduate Research Exhibition celebrates research in all its aspects as an essential and exciting part of graduate education at Penn State. Established in 1986, the Graduate Exhibition places special emphasis on communicating research and creative endeavor to a general audience and offers an opportunity for professional development by challenging graduate students to present their work in clear, comprehensible terms to people outside their fields.

Penn State Center for Arts & Crafts Annual Artists and Instructors Exhibition

Art Alley, Display Cases
March 24 – April 24, 2016

 

This exhibit will feature two- and three-dimensional artwork in media and disciplines representing the range of art classes available at the Center for Arts & Crafts.

For more than 40 years the Center for Arts & Crafts has provided quality programs and services for the ever-changing social, educational, and recreational needs of the Centre County Community. Their main office and classrooms are located in Ritenour Building at the corner of Pollock and Shortlidge Roads, and the Ceramics Studio is located in the HUB-Robeson Center. The Center for Arts & Crafts offers a variety of non-credit adult art classes during Fall and Spring semesters, and children’s art camp in the summer. All classes are taught by Penn State University Art majors, Art Education majors, graduate students, and professional artists.

Art by Vesco — Joe Vescovich

Art Alley
May 20 – September 18, 2016

 

Painting and sculpture can be defined by their differences in viewer interaction; a sculpture is intended to be viewed from various different perspectives and angles, whereas a painting is intended to be viewed from one side. Joe Vescovich’s work, however, can be truthfully referred to as sculptural paintings, as they do not exclusively fit either definition. Combining wood, metal, and photography with encaustic, a form of painting that utilizes melted wax, allows Vescovich to create these dynamic wall sculptures that are intended to be viewed from a variety of perspectives.

To create his encaustics, Vescovich applies a mixture of heated beeswax, pigments, and dammar resign to the sculptures. Beeswax is used specifically for its receptivity to oil paint and other pigments and its malleability; however, wax’s essential characteristic is to harden as soon as it leaves the heat source, so Vescovich must work quickly to make decisions and let the wax find its place. After the wax has cooled, he can manipulate its surface by scraping, carving, or adding more layers. Vescovich compliments this layering process with lines, textures, geometric shapes, and repetition to create dynamic patterns and an appearance of depth in order to draw the viewer’s eye into and around the surface of the piece.

Joe Vescovich’s education includes studies through the DeMazia Foundation of the Barnes Art Museum, the University of the Arts (UArts), and the International Encaustics workshop. He has exhibited his encaustics at the Philadelphia Welcome Center, at Derrek’s in Manayunk, Philadelphia, and at Abstract Expressions Gallery in Mount Holly, New Jersey.

Decorum — Kiana Honarmand

HUB Gallery
May 27 – September 11, 2016

 

Kiana Honarmand’s work focuses on issues related to her cultural identity, especially the treatment of women in Iran’s society, the male gaze, censorship, and surveillance. These are difficulties that everybody living in Iran, especially women, must deal with on a daily basis.

Growing up in Iran, Honarmand felt stuck between tradition and modernity, as did many others in her generation. Iran had already been westernized before the 1979 revolution changed the culture to a more religious and traditional one. She explores and finds inspiration in the differences between the Middle East, where she grew up, and the West, where she lives now. Merging the imagery of her past with her new cultural environment allows her to address the Western perception of the Middle East.

Honarmand is a conceptual artist; all of the aesthetic and technical decisions she makes are driven by her concepts and ideas. She employs photography as her primary medium, but also includes sculpture, painting, and collage as a means to convey her ideas. She also often incorporates a number of modern technologies, such as laser cutters, C.N.C. routers, 3D scanners, and 3D printers.

Kiana Honarmand was born in Iran and moved to the United States in order to pursue her Master of Fine Arts degree from Penn State, which she completed in 2014. She has exhibited her work both in the United States and internationally. Currently Honarmand resides in Pennsylvania.

Artes Exempli

Robeson Gallery
May 17 – September 7, 2016

 

Examples of Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, and Surrealism supplemented by videos and informational charts provide the viewer with a crash-course in European Art History. The featured paintings, all completed by one very adaptive painter, closely mimic the painting styles of the ‘greats’, including Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Vincent Van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian, Salvador Dali, René Magritte, and many others.

Wolfgang and Brigitte’s collection of fine art copies began while the two were living in China. During a trip to one of the numerous Chinese art markets, the couple came across a talented young artist. Wolfgang asked her to copy one of his favorite Picassos. Shortly after, the three worked together for almost 5 years to produce around 100 paintings of various artists and movements.

Wolfgang Gunter, a native of Cologne, Germany, received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Cologne in 1976. His thirty year career in the chemical industry took him around the world, from Germany to Brussels, to the United States and China. After retiring in 2003, he returned to the United States with his wife Brigitte. Wolfgang’s love of art began at a young age, and he is now an avid art lover and collector. He is also a dive master, a hobby cook, and a close follower of astronomy and science in general.

Misty Frederick-Ritz

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
June 3 – September 15, 2016

 

Misty Frederick-Ritz is a painter, jewelry maker, mixed media artist, and digital artist from State College, Pennsylvania. She has a passion for door and texture and loves spending time in her studio. She primarily works with acrylics, water colors, water soluble crayons, inks, polymer clay, beads and buttons, fabrics and fibers, and colored pencils. Frederick-Ritz’s recent works, painted in a stye known as “contemporary symbolism,” best represent her as a creative and spiritual person. Frequently featuring a feminine archetype, her paintings are an “outer” representation of her “inner” self.

Christine Smith

Display Cases
September 19 – December 15, 2016

 

Christine Smith has always had a passion for the natural environment. Graduating from Penn State with an environmental education degree, she has explored many sides of northeastern flora and fauna. Through her papercuttings, she enjoys highlighting the beauty that is constantly around us, although sometimes overlooked. She also has a fascination with the idea of made-up worlds. She finds inspiration through her two small children to investigate and to travel into these secret places. Usually, the longer you look at her pieces, the more you will discover.

Jin Yan

Art on the Move — Old Main
September 26, 2016 – March 17, 2017

 

Jin Yan describes her drawings as randomized daily visions that incorporate the people and interactions she witnesses in her daily life. She finds inspiration in these common moments, whether it’s someone in line at the coffee shop, a conversation she overheard, a quote from the book she’s been reading, or simply an old photograph.

When drawing, Yan often focuses on a single person, intensely observing them. However, she doesn’t draw every line she sees; instead she bends the truth, contouring in a deliberate way by freeing her hands from accuracy and allowing her mind to lead her hand in reflecting an honest depiction of her poetic thinking. Often, Yan combines her poetry with her visuals in order to emphasize the impact of both expressions.

Jin Yan is a current Penn State student majoring in Communications and minoring in English. She describes herself as a poetry lover and a YouTube addict.

Stephanie Seguin

Display Cases
September 27, 2016 – January 7, 2017

 

Stephanie Seguin makes functional, decorative ceramic sculptures that are meant to be used and become a part of people’s lives. Decoration is important, as she wants her pieces to captivate the eye in addition to serving their functions. Her decorations are often influenced by quilts, Korean and Persian historical pottery, art nouveau design aesthetics, and she always finds inspiration in nature.

To Seguin, applying slips, carving patterns, and layering glazes is a form of meditation that she tries to pass on to her audience by encouraging viewers to explore each piece’s complexity in design and form. She also tries to provide comfort with her work; whether it is the physical comfort of how it feels in the hand or the comfort of the soul that comes from serving a family recipe in a beautiful bowl.

The Importance of the Unimportant — Henry Klimowicz

Robeson Gallery
September 28 – November 17, 2016

 

Henry Klimowicz’s sculptures do not leave the viewer with any questions about what material he uses to make each piece. Collected from multiple grocery stores, hardware stores, and shipments from other artists, Klimowicz gives new life to ordinary single-ply cardboard. He makes no effort to hide or disguise the material’s past as small tears, box creases, and even printed product letters are visible on his sculptures. “It isn’t the material that gives something to the viewer,” Klimowicz says, “it is what I put into it — my vision creates whatever image the viewer takes away from the piece.”

Klimowicz has been working with cardboard as his primary material since 1986. Armed with a utility knife and a hot glue gun, he methodically transforms it into large-scale sculptures, pushing the material as far as possible. Working with cardboard allows Klimowicz to create a dialogue between art and the natural world, and the adaptable nature of his work allows him to work freely. When he begins his sculptures Klimowicz does not set out with a clear idea of how the finished piece will look. Instead, he lets the piece develop itself, making aesthetic decisions along the way and without consciously thinking about where a piece is going or if it’s going well.

“Cardboard is simple and straightforward,” says Klimowicz. “It is also a severely limited material. It has an ever-present cultural bias related to its past uses as a container or its present use as waste. I love it when the material transcends its cultural confines. If I can make something beautiful from cardboard, I have then said that anything can be made valuable, fruitful, or hopeful. I see this work as very positive because of the lengths that have been traveled by the material from trash to beauty. It is a statement about the possible — that all things can be redeemed, often for more that what was deposited. Creativity can be that redeemer.”

Henry Klimowicz grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a Bachelor in Fine Arts Degree. He earned his Master of Fine Arts from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia and currently resides in Millerton, New York.

FaceAge

Art Alley
September 29 – December 9, 2016

 

FaceAge is an immersive three-screen visual and audio installation which functions as the centerpiece of the FaceAge exhibit. Cross generational encounters are conveyed across six sensory-rich sections, each designed to shift the observer’s embodied experience of aging. Viewers may enter the 55 minute film loop at any point for any amount of time – each encounter will provide its own experience. This project provides a much needed space within a culture where generations tend to be dispersed physically.

Led by the power of the arts to engage communities and ideas, the FaceAge collaboration is an innovative template for cross-disciplinary research and intergenerational community engagement.

As a model for transdisciplinary arts research, FaceAge offers a timely case study for examining and exploring innovative ways in which third-space collaborations — particularly in Arts and Health — can be extended into the sphere of public engagement, with measurable outcomes and impacts. The FaceAge creators aim for a deeper understanding of the lived experience for individuals across generations and how the arts can impact people’s perceptions of aging. They are also interested in extending FaceAge as an embodied, experiential template for engaging the public in other important medical concerns such as end-of-life issues, child abuse, nutrition, and active lifestyles.

FaceAge community engagement efforts begin with the personal experience encountering the installation, witnessing intergenerational interactions on the screen, and listening to powerful stories revealed by filmed FaceAge individuals. Following their experience of the installation, visitors are invited to create their own FaceAge experience by participating in an intergenerational Story Circle.

Following this Penn State residency at the HUB-Robeson Center, FaceAge will be touring to museums, arts and film festivals, universities, and health care centers throughout the US and internationally.

FaceAge Core Partners include: Arts & Design Research Incubator, Penn State College of Arts & Architecture, Center for Healthy Aging, Penn State College of Health and Human Development, Penn State College of Nursing, and the Department of Film Studies, University of North Carolina – Wilmington.

Deconstructed Form — Stephanie Seguin

HUB Gallery
September 30 – December 4, 2016

 

Utilizing clay, paper, and installation, Stephanie Seguin will create an immersive space that is not complete until a viewer is present. Her total installation not only physically immerses the viewer but is psychologically absorptive too — much like how one gets lost in an epic novel or feels fully immersed in a movie or theatre production. By giving the viewer a sense of being engulfed by a space Seguin invites the viewer to sit and spend time with the work and to focus on their relationship to the objects rather than focusing on the objects alone.

Taking into consideration the relationship of the clay and paper vessels, the proximity of the viewer, directionality of the viewer’s gaze, lighting, and shadows, Seguin attempts to create an awareness of how one’s perspective changes their perception. Her minimalist approach allows the viewer to inject their own subjectivity and perceive the work through their own projections and interpretations.

Seguin’s installation includes nearly 100 clay and paper vessels. The cast paper forms mimic the hand-built clay vessels to create a form of after-image and build tension between the differing visual textures and weights. Seguin deliberately chose to work with clay, paper, and wood in this exhibition as these materials are seen frequently through historical and contemporary design, and using them allows her to bridge the familiar with the unfamiliar.

Stephanie Seguin earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts with an emphasis in Ceramics from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2009. She has since been an Apprentice in Whitefish, Montana, Studio Assistant and Instructor at Maho Bay Clay Works on St. John, United States Virgin Islands, and Workshop and Facility Assistant at La Maridiana; International School of the Ceramic Arts in Italy. She is currently a Master of Fine Arts student at Penn State.

2015

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 5 – January 24, 2015

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two— and three—dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community.

Chinese Students Overseas Impressions: A Comparison by Xiaoyi Ma

Art Alley
January 7 – March 3, 2015

 

During his freshman year, Xiaoyi Ma discovered that while he and his fellow Chinese students were living extremely different lives than those they were accustomed to, very few other people realized or even considered what Chinese overseas students at Penn State were experiencing. Chinese Students Oversea Impressions: A Comparison began as a way to document the lives of average Chinese students and expose their inner world.

As the project progressed, it became clear to Ma that simple documentation wasn’t enough. It was then that the focus of his project shifted from documentation to expression. Ma found inspiration in his own feelings and experiences as a Chinese student, allowing him to use photography to reveal his inner thoughts and focus on what was felt rather than what was lived.

The photographs featured in this exhibition provide a side-by-side comparison and allow the viewer to experience the differences and the similarities in the lives of Chinese students both here in America and in China.

Jennifer Shuey

Art on the Move — Old Main
January 15 – May 10, 2015

 

Jennifer enjoys capturing the essence of our local landscape through her use of pastels. Vibrant and spontaneous, working with pastels gives Jennifer an almost meditative creative outlet that is a good complement to her work as the Executive Director of the ClearWater Conservancy of Central Pennsylvania. She aims to enrich the viewer’s emotional connection to nature and inspire them to become involved in conservation.

Brian Gaither

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
January 19 – March 4, 2015

 

Based on a tradition of social critique, Brian Gaither creates art that evokes humor, inspiration, introspection and discussion through an examination of the human condition. Through his work, Gaither explores the existence and interaction of ideologies that shape social institutions, the juxtaposition of group and individual identities, and the perpetuation of social conflict. Brian is currently pursuing a Master of Fine Arts in Drawing and Painting at the Pennsylvania State University.

Jeremy Drey

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
January 26 – April 30, 2015

 

“Making images with an out of date process seemed only appropriate when capturing old mechanical items that have also become out of date,” Jeremy says of this collection of photographs captured on traditional black and white film. “The relaxing approach to this photography has allowed me to hone an artistic style in all aspects of my photography life.”

THEM: Images of Separation

HUB Gallery
January 23 – March 1, 2015

 

THEM: Images of Separation is a traveling exhibition from the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University. This exhibit showcases items from popular culture, such as postcards, license plates, games, souvenirs and costumes, which promote stereotyping against women, poor Whites, homosexuals, Jewish Americans, Native Americans, Mexican Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans and others. THEM provides a powerful experience of how stereotyping lingers — subtly and not so subtly — today.

THEM follows up the success of the Hateful Things exhibition, hosted by the HUB-Robeson Galleries in the Spring of 2012. Hateful Things focused specifically on imagery demeaning to African-Americans. In response to the several questions asking why no objects dealing with other groups were featured, Ferris State University professor of Social Sciences David Pilgrim said, “For this show, we took our direction from Martin Luther King’s famous quote, ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.’ This is the next logical step for the Jim Crow Museum. I’m hoping THEM shows discrimination and stereotyping is not just a black/white issue — it’s more pervasive than that.”

The Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia is an international leader in the fight against racism. Founded on the idea that everyday racist items can be used as educational tools, the museum aims to use its thousands of Jim Crow era artifacts to teach visitors how to recognize and confront racism.

Them: Images of Separation is sponsored by the Paul Robeson Cultural Center, the University Park Allocation Committee, and the HUB-Robeson Galleries.

Xin Wen

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
January 30 – April 26, 2015

 

Xin Wen is a new media artist exploring issues of self-identification among Chinese women struggling to find a balance between tradition and modern society. Her work is further inspired by the notion that images are superficial, yet powerful. Wen’s interactive feminist series, Turn Over Two Sides, leaves the viewer questioning the mask of one’s identity. Wen is currently pursuing a Master of Fine Arts in New Media at the Pennsylvania State University.

Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Art: A Retrospective

Robeson Gallery
February 20 – April 26, 2015

 

This exhibition is a culmination of photographers, painters, quilt makers, curators and scholars, including work from Bayeté Ross Smith, Robert Pruitt, Terry Boddie, Malvina Latham, Rick Lowell, Kimberly Camp, Dr. Deborah Willis, Betye Saar, John Pinderhughes, Dawoud Bey and Wendell White. Also included are the works of a number of established artists from Haiti and loaned work from the collection of Dr. Eric Robertson and Hank Willis.

Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Art: A Retrospective is a retrospective of exhibitions hosted by the Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Art (The Hurston) in the past decade. Founded in 1990 in Eatonville, — home of the renowned Harlem Renaissance writer and the first incorporated black community in America — the museum is committed to the philosophical legacy of Zora Neale Hurston. In the past 10 years, The Hurston has hosted multiple exhibitions featuring the work of notable contemporary African American artists, including Faith Ringgold, Sam Gilliam, Elizabeth Catlett and Terry Adkins.

The Hurston’s unique mission has been to actively integrate its visiting artists into the community, establishing a reciprocity between art makers and the communities they serve. The activation of arts in communities provides a validation for the works of the artists and the method by which community members may continue to communicate and understand one another’s needs. Through the course of artist residencies, exhibitions, community projects and the annual Zora! Festival, The Hurston and its parent organization, the Association to Preserve the Eatonville Community, continue to activate the arts toward the cause of a universal understanding of our common humanity.

Leagh Anderson

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
March 12 – May 4, 2015

 

Leagh Anderson uses wool fibers and the ancient technique of felt making to explore a new sculptural textile form. She finds inspiration in the cycles and seasons of nature, and the colors, textures, and forms that nature takes. Leagh’s work is an intuitive process, shaped by experiences that move her. Many of her expressions have grown out of her concern for this fragile planet and her appreciation for its beauty.

Penn State Center for Arts & Crafts Annual Artists and Instructors Exhibition

Art Alley, Display Cases
March 17 – April 30, 2015

 

The Penn State Center for Arts and Crafts’ artists and instructors will showcase their artwork in Art Alley and the first floor Exhibit Cases. This exhibit will feature two- and three-dimensional artwork in media and disciplines representing the range of art classes available at the CFAC.

The Center for Arts and Crafts has offered non-credit adult art classes to Penn State students, faculty and staff during each of the university semesters and a children’s summer art camp for more than 40 years. The Center for Arts & Crafts is located in 3 Ritenour and has a ceramics studio in B8 HUB.

Slinky for Pennsylvania State Toy

Art Alley
March 18, 2015

 

Bob Swaim is a man on a mission — a mission to make the Slinky the official Pennsylvania State Toy. His quest takes him all over the state to various events and venues giving presentations and demonstrations on the Slinky. On March 18th he’ll be stationed near Art Alley with an assortment of ramps, stairs and Slinkys for students to play and experiment with.

Richard James invented the Slinky in Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania, and the toy had it’s debut in Gimbels Department Store in Philadelphia in 1945. Richard and his wife Betty, whom he had met while they were both enrolled at Penn State, continued manufacturing Slinky in Clifton Heights until the couple’s split in 1964 after which Betty James took over the company and relocated production to Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. Swaim notes these Pennsylvania roots as his motivation to recognize the Slinky as the official Pennsylvania State Toy.

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 20 – May 3, 2015

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to display their work in a professional setting. Visual Arts students will exhibit artwork in a variety of media, based on their in-progress work towards their thesis portfolio.

The Annual Graduate Research Exhibition celebrates research in all its aspects as an essential and exciting part of graduate education at Penn State. Established in 1986, the exhibition places special emphasis on communicating research and creative endeavor to a general audience and offers an opportunity for professional development by challenging graduate students to present their work in clear, comprehensible terms to people outside their fields.

Brienne Brown

Art on the Move — Old Main
March 11, 2015 – January 17, 2016

 

Brienne Brown finds beauty in everyday life, the so-called “mundane.” Ordinary people going about their daily lives inspire Brown to capture a moment in time rather than a particular location. She begins her paintings by choosing a subject and lightly sketching general guidelines. As the paintings progress she begins to focus less on the details of the scene and more on her impressions of where she is.

Brienne’s formal education focused primarily on Chemistry with a second major in Art. After earning her Master’s degree, she worked in a toxicology lab until the birth of her first child. Leaving her job gave her the opportunity to paint more consistently and develop her skill. Brown has since shown her work in several juried exhibitions and won many awards, and has taught and attended numerous workshops.

Nicole Packard

Art on the Move — Old Main
May 11 – September 20, 2015

 

Creativity and imagination have always been a part of Nicole Packard’s everyday life. She is fascinated by the line between reality and fantasy and the duality of beauty and destruction. Much of her work deals with the idea of mapping information that isn’t easily quantified, which allows for the development of a more complex and visually rich environment. Nicole is a 2014 graduate of Penn State, and holds a Bachelor of Science in Art Education and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Drawing and Painting.

John Mangan

Art on the Move —Student Health Center
May 13 – September 13, 2015

Art on the Move —West Halls Cultural Lounge
September 24 – December 13, 2015

Art on the Move —North Halls Cultural Lounge
September 29, 2015 – January 10, 2016

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
September 17, 2015 – January 10, 2016

 

John Mangan was a Penn State Continuing Education Drawing and Painting Instructor who unfortunately passed away on September 9, 2014. He is remembered as being an incredibly gifted artist with a unique visionary aesthetic. Mangan was an active artist, exhibiting his work frequently at several venues throughout Central Pennsylvania.

Farmland Preservation Artists of Central Pennsylvania

HUB Gallery
May 22 – July 26, 2015

 

This exhibit features depictions of local farms and rural landscapes created in a variety of media by the Farmland Preservation Artists of Central Pennsylvania. The Farmland Preservation Artists of Central Pennsylvania was formed in late 2005 and is a joint enterprise of the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania and the Centre County Farmland Trust. Their mission is to promote the preservation and appreciation of farmland by portraying the beauty of rural landscapes, local farms, and their agricultural products, highlighting farm life and local food markets, and illustrating the issues that affect farmers and our communities. The Farmland Preservation Artists of Central Pennsylvania also increase support for farmland preservation through exhibitions and artwork sales.

John Mangan Retrospective

Robeson Gallery
May 26 – July 18, 2015

 

John Mangan was an art instructor in Drawing and Painting for 20 years through Penn State’s Continuing Education program. Sadly, he passed away on September 9, 2014 at the age of 54. He is remembered as being an incredibly gifted artist with a unique visionary aesthetic. Mangan was an active artist, exhibiting his work frequently at several venues throughout Central Pennsylvania. He left behind an extensive collection of drawings, paintings, and prints.

John Mangan grew up in the Fordham section of the Bronx, New York as a first generation Irish immigrant and spent his childhood summers on his grandparent’s farm in Ireland. He had a strong connection to the natural world, and lived for over 25 years in the Julian Woods Community. He studied drawing and lithography at the Institute Del Arte in Urbino Italy, earned his Bachelor of Arts in Printmaking, Drawing, Sculpture, and Ceramics at the The State University of New York at Oneonta, and earned his Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking and Drawing at Penn State University Park. John Mangan is remembered as a true artist, a devoted teacher, and a great friend and mentor to many.

Elody Gyekis

Art Alley
May 27 – September 6, 2015

 

Elody Gyekis finds inspiration in her travels throughout the United States, Central America, Europe, and Asia. Documenting these diverse visual stimuli through photography and memory provides Gyekis with the interesting references she uses to create her paintings.

This exhibit displays a wide range of subject matter including landscapes and cityscapes, portraits and figures, and flora and fauna. Also included is a small selection of paintings from her Mythological series, in which Gyekis pieces together well-known mythological beings from her collected references. The new versions of these creatures in their equally stunning and surreal landscapes invite the viewer to leap into the scenes and discover whatever blessing or curse these beings may bring.

Elody Gyekis earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Ceramics from Penn State and is a resident artist at the Green Drake Gallery and Arts Center in Pennsylvania. She’s exhibited her work in several cities across the country including Philadelphia, Syracuse, Tucson, and Harrisburg. Gyekis has served as a Community Arts Organizer and has painted nine murals across Pennsylvania and one mural in an orphanage in the Dominican Republic. She is currently working on a mural in Toms River, New Jersey.

BorrandoFronteras/ErasingBorders

HUB Gallery
September 8 – December 6, 2015

 

Evoking themes of memory, reconciliation, hybridity, and the bridging of identities; BorrandoFronteras/ErasingBorders is an art exhibition showcasing multi-media work by Cuban and Cuban-American artists: Jorge Elias Gil, Lino R. Menendez Loynaz, Yuniel Castillo Delgado, Karina Bermudez Ortiz, and Leslie C. Sotomayor.

Despite the expanding Cuban and Cuban-American population in the U.S. there is little acknowledgement of Cuba’s rich hybrid ethnic identities and very little awareness of Cuban-American culture beyond a few urban centers. Migration produces a fluid and often non-linear culture with multiple origins and connections that expand beyond geographical borders. As U.S. and Cuban relations continue to shift and significantly impact each other’s cultures and politics, conversations continue to emerge around diaspora.

This exhibit is the culmination of collaborations and conversations between the artists who together apply their life experiences to explore themes of identity and migration and to offer a cultural exchange that bridges these seemingly disparate communities.

Jewelry Designs by Janise Crow

Display Cases
September 15 – December 6, 2015

 

Janise Crow is a mixed media jewelry artist with a number of collections all consisting of one of a kind designs. Many of Crow’s designs use a multitude of techniques blended with various media from several eras. She combines a delicate balance of old and new, movement, color, texture, themes, recyclables, and memories into one piece of wearable art. Crow’s creative genre speaks for itself and appeals to women who appreciate individuality.

Crow is a resident of State College with family ties to Penn State. She is a full-time wig specialist and is a self-taught jewelry artist. She started making jewelry in 2007 with her wire sculpted pendants and beading collections. From there her nature to cherish things of the past and refurbish them into unique modern jewelry has led to the creation of her collections: artisan aluminum, which utilizes recycled soda cans, and modern vintage and sentimental jewelry, which incorporates recycled jewelry components and highly collectable vintage costume jewelry.

Images by Maggie Wolszczan

Art Alley
September 22 – December 13, 2015

 

Maggie Wolszczan, also known as Art Margaux, creates beautiful, bright, and vibrant large-scale oil paintings that feature a variety of flowers and other nature themes. Her love of traveling is instrumental to her growth as an artist and has opened her eyes to color, light, beauty, and antiquity and modernity. All of the experiences she’s had in different regions relate back to her love of art as her paintings are translations of places that she has traveled to and photographed herself.

Wolszczan was born in Poland, and resided there until the age of 5. She then spent the next 8 years of her childhood in Puerto Rico, where she found much of her inspiration to paint. After graduating from State College Area High School, Wolszczan expanded her art education at Ringling College of Art in Sarasota, Florida and Design and Art Center College of Design in San Diego, California. She has since returned to the State College Area, adopted Art Margaux as her nickname, and is now the owner of the Fraser Street Gallery in downtown State College.

Birth of the Painted World — Jivya Mashe and the Warli Tradition of India

Robeson Gallery
September 25 – November 19, 2015

 

Birth of the Painted World, curated by Dr. Stephen Hirshon, Professor of Art History, features paintings from the collections of Sanchi Gillett and Gallerie AK by Jivya Mashe, the master of the traditional art of the Warli Tribe, as well as paintings by his sons Sadashiva and Balu Mashe, his grandson and granddaughter, and other Warli artists completed between 1999–2012. Also on view are photographs of the Warlis by Martin Strasmore.

The Warli are a tribe of 300,000 people that live about 100 miles from Mumbai (formerly known as Bombay) in the state of Maharashtra, India. They speak a language that has no written form, and for thousands of years women of the tribe rendered intricate paintings on the walls of their earthen homes during times of festivals and marriages as an invocation and blessing. When Jivya Mashe was orphaned as a young boy, he refused to speak and only expressed himself pictorially, drawing figures and scenes in the earth, using the ancient Warli painting style as his reference. As Jivya’s verbal silence continued for a number of years, his visual expression developed into an artistic voice that would soon be translated into award winning paintings on paper and canvas.

Jivya Mashe became the first man to render paintings in the traditional Warli style and has since received numerous awards and has been recognized by two Presidents of India as the leading master of Warli painting. His success has sparked a growing interest in Warli art worldwide and greater numbers of Warli children, men, and women are learning this craft. Mashe’s paintings have been shown in prestigious galleries and museums in Europe, Japan, Canada, and India. This is the first major retrospective of his works in the United States.

A hands-on participatory workshop for children and families will be taught by esteemed Warli artist Sadashiva Mashe on October 17th at 10am in the Robeson Gallery lobby. This workshop is a rare opportunity to study with an accomplished Warli artist. Sadashiva is traveling to the United States from India for the exhibition opening and will be teaching the basics of Warli art, including common Warli symbols.

Sadashiva Mashe's trip to Penn State for the reception and workshop is sponsored by Gallerie AK.

Alyce Ritti

Art on the Move — Old Main
October 12 – January 17, 2015

 

Alyce Ritti is a mixed-media artist who combines paper cutouts, fabric, jewelry, feathers, and other found objects to create her unique and playful collages. Each collage is created with the intention of starting a conversation with the viewer, often laced with social and political commentaries and accompanied by a touch of humor and absurdity.

2014

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 3 – January 18, 2014

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two— and three—dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community.

Michelle Holt

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
January 24 – May 11, 2014

 

Michelle Holt's photographs explore the indescribable feeling of seeing her childhood neighborhood as an unrecognizable place. Returning to New Jersey to photograph the damage following Hurricane Sandy was a surreal experience with severe specifics, including exposed pipes and shattered glass, that made what was once normal look like a scene from a horror film. These images are Holt's reality, a hurricane which tore apart not only homes, but lives as well.

On the Wild Side — 
Woodcarvings by Jim Mikkelsen & Quilts by Sylvia Apple

HUB Gallery
January 28 – March 2, 2014

 

Jim Mikkelsen, a sculptor, creates figurative pieces out of wood in a way that he says exposes a tree's story or "soul." Using logs from trees that have been removed by humans or uprooted by nature, Mikkelsen lets the features of the wood determine the shape of the work, lending to an organic, graceful piece.

"I feel highly motivated to preserve a piece of [a tree's beauty] rather than let it be lost to the fireplace, landfill, of even decay in its cycle of rebirth," said Mikkelsen.

Artist Sylvia Apple allows prehistoric and folk art to inspire her as she constructs her quilts. Ancient art forms and natural symbols often find their way into her compositions, which use metaphors to signify the fragile nature of our existence.

"As a young adult, I had the idea that I should create work which was completely finished and would survive indefinitely," said Apple. "Today, however, I often leave parts of my work raw or unfinished to allude to the fragmented and uneven qualities of nature."

Danny Ferrell

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
February 10 – May 6, 2014

 

Danny Ferrell's paintings explore the raw sores of sexuality and the wounds of disenfranchisement. Examined through an anecdotal lens, he utilizes self-portraiture and images of his partner to demonstrate their social displacement, both as individuals and together as a couple.

Visions of the Mind — NAWA 125th Anniversary Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
February 21 – April 20, 2014

 

The National Association of Women Artists, the American pioneer organization, celebrates its 125th Anniversary during Women's History Month, with this exhibition, Visions of the Mind. A juried group of living artists in the current membership, they have evolved, been influenced, and influenced — at least over the last century and a quarter of the organization's existence. The airy and spacious Robeson Gallery will feature the unique female perspective and handling of painting, drawing, printmaking, photographic, and sculpture media.

Leslie Sotomayor

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
March 18 – May 25,  August 20 – September 21, 2014

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
September 3, 2014 – January 8, 2015

 

Leslie C. Sotomayor's work revolves around themes of memories, nostalgia, and how the culmination of our experiences build our heritage and identity. These large color field paintings are created with many layers of acrylic stains worked back and forth; they're then cropped, stretched, and re-worked. This process is similar to life experiences, which build and re-shape history, the present, and the future.

Out of Here

Art Alley
March 19 – April 27, 2014

 

Judy Chicago is one of the most daring and controversial artists of contemporary times, and is recognized as a founder of the feminist art movement. Karen Keifer-Boyd, Professor of Art Education and Women's studies, will be teaming up with Artist-in-residence Nancy Youdelman, a student of Judy Chicago in the Feminist Art Program in 1970, to teach a special topics course incorporating Chicago's feminist art teaching methodology. Course participants will use this methodology to create interactive content-based visual and performative art to engage the community in the Out of Here exhibition to be held in Art Alley.

The exhibition will begin on March 19 with an emergent form, a visual map out of here, that will grow and change over the following 5 weeks as a result of activities led by the course participants in the HUB and throughout campus, including the virtual spaces of World Campus and from contacting Penn State Alumni. 

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 28 – April 27, 2014

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to display their work in a professional setting. Visual Arts students will exhibit artwork in a variety of media, based on their in-progress work towards their thesis portfolio.

The Annual Graduate Exhibition celebrates research in all its aspects as an essential and exciting part of graduate education at Penn State. Established in 1986, the Graduate Exhibition places special emphasis on communicating research and creative endeavor to a general audience and offers an opportunity for professional development by challenging graduate students to present their work in clear, comprehensible terms to people outside their fields.

Kathleen Chovit

Art on the Move — Old Main
May 11 – September 7, 2014

 

Kathleen feels a particular connection to the fields, the sky, the ridges, and the woodlands surrounding her Centre County home. She often works outdoors or “en plein air,” which allows her to show the interactions between the shades and textures of sunlight with the surface of a field of wildflowers or a distant mountain.

Kathleen has been painting full-time for 17 years, and all of her knowledge has come from self-directed independent study.

Abby Drey

Art on the Move — Old Main
May 11 – September 7, 2014

 

“Wandering through overgrown fields and woods throughout Pennsylvania, I’ve found beauty in things that some people see as junk, things of the past left to decay,” Abby says.

Abby, a 2010 Penn State graduate and staff photographer for the Centre Daily Times, enjoys creating images that are “completely different from [her] photojournalism work.”

Passages — Recent Paintings by Alice Kelsey

HUB Gallery
May 20 – July 31, 2014

 

Passages arose from Kelsey’s explorations in and around Centre County and celebrate the wonder of the Centre County region’s natural areas. Many were begun on location outdoors (en plain air), using a portable easel and backpack with art supplies. “I learn so much from nature when painting outdoors — noticing colors, and sense of mass and movement, and the works have a sense of ‘what was stirring there’ —a feel of the wind, or sun, or the warmth of the day.” Kelsey discovers inspiring places during many outdoor adventures, including hiking, horseback riding, and flyfishing. In keeping with the painting’s inspirational source in the land of central Pennsylvania, the majority of works in the exhibit are presented in custom frames made from local hardwoods, including walnut, maple, sycamore, and butternut.

Kelsey’s artistic development extends from childhood sketching sessions with her grandfather, to courses in painting, drawing, and printmaking throughout high school and college. Her affinity for the natural world stems from early experiences. “I grew up in a beautiful, varied, open section of eastern Pennsylvania…I feel that this land nurtured me to be an artist — growing up my sensitivity and appreciation for color and form, and a sense of belonging to the land.” Kelsey also finds a bridging of her spiritual journey in the process of painting. “When I’m painting with a harmony of inner and outer forces, color and strokes flow with a sense of guidance beyond myself, and the painting becomes filled with ‘something more’…a ‘reservoir of Spirit.’ The process feels surprising and mysterious…a powerful tenderness. I’m so thankful to be a working artist, and to live within the carried natural areas of Central Pennsylvania which fuel my spirit and inspire me to create.”

Kelsey focuses on art full-time, and her paintings have received recognition in regional and national juried exhibitions, and are represented by several galleries.

Kim Bogart

Art Alley
May 22 – September 5, 2014

 

Kim is fascinated by the idea that all animals need an unconscious to survive and that our unconscious
notices things that our mind does not, and she uses her paintings as a way to explore these complexities of the unconscious. Many of the shapes that she renders in her work signify a portal between conscious and unconscious thought, and also represent the line that she crossed when she moved from representational to abstract artwork. Kim’s paintings can be divided into layers, with the under layer containing controlled and meticulous details that represent the biological or circumstantial details of our lives that we can’t control. The upper lays contain loose, spontaneous, and gestural marks that represent our individual subjective responses to those uncontrollable restraints and conditions.

Kim graduated from Penn State in 2013 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing. She has participated in two group exhibitions in the Edwin W. Zoller Gallery, and has had a solo exhibition entitled The Event Horizon in the Patterson Gallery.

Daphne Smallwood

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
June 4 – August 14, 2014

 

As a child growing up in North Philadelphia, Daphne was often surrounded by drugs, sex, and violence. Instead of allowing her hands to contribute to the negativity surrounding her, Daphne chose to use them for something positive and began using art to distract herself from her impoverished state.

Daphne often depicts herself in her work, seeking to cover and uncover parts of herself through oil painting and collage. Utilizing race, religion, and gender, Daphne seeks to examine the things that are often left silent in a society of masking. She aims to create a conversation between religion and sex in order to question religious systems.

Daphne is a Penn State senior graduating in August 2014 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts with a concentration in Painting and Drawing.

State College Area School District Teachers and Students Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
June 4 – July 13, 2014

 

This exhibition is a unique take on the Annual State College Area School District Exhibition as the teachers will be joining the students in displaying artwork. The students will be provided with the rare opportunity to see their work in the same exhibition as the professional artwork of their teachers.

The Fluidity of Gender: Sculpture by Linda Stein

HUB Gallery
September 5 – November 30, 2014

 

Linda Stein is an artist-activist who explores gender roles and stereotypes through the creation of her larger-than-life, heroic female torsos and figures. They are intended to scramble gender expectations and merge opposites: they are female and male; and everything in-between; they are strong though soft, warrior-like albeit pacifist guardians. The black leather torsos and seven-foot figures — created with buckles, zippers, and chains — are complemented by more colorful acrylicized-paper torsos featuring iconic Wonder Woman motifs. The sculptures have a unique push-pull tension: an inviting playfulness, and yet are fierce and formidable in a way that may make one want to step back.

During her talk on October 1 from 6-7pm in Freeman Auditorium, Linda Stein will discuss her work and inspiration. Her talks have been praised as being informative, humorous, and thoughtful. At the public reception following the talk, visitors will be invited to try on some of Stein’s sculpture, giving them the opportunity to change “skins” with varying gender-bending results. Participants will be able to feel new bodies, avatars, sometimes with accompanying brain changes.

The Fluidity of Gender is part of a seven-year touring exhibition, lecture, and performance that will see more than twenty-four museums and galleries through 2017.

Linda Stein is Founding President of the non-profit corporation Have Art: Will Travel! Inc. emphasizing Gender Justice and anti–bullying. She is Art Editor of On The Issues Magazine and is represented by Flomenhaft Gallery in Manhattan. For more information on Linda and her work, visit LindaStein.com and HaveArtWillTravel.org.

Jeremy Dennis

Art on the Move — Old Main
September 11, 2014 – January 8, 2015

 

Jeremy Dennis continues his Native American tradition of using stories and legends to deal with mysteries and the unknown. Using digital photography, Jeremy explores his own mysteries, including where he comes from and who his people are. His supernatural, photo-realistic images transition Native American myths and legends into a more contemporary form. Intentionally ambiguous, Jeremy’s photographic collages afford the viewer the opportunity to see a different story and meaning with each viewing.

Jeremy Dennis was born in Southampton, New York and was raised on the Shinnecock Indian Reservation. In 2013, he received his Bachelor of Arts from Stony Brook University in New York.

Jennifer Kane

Art on the Move — Old Main
September 11, 2014 – January 8, 2015

 

As part of her effort to observe and reflect what she sees and feels, Jennifer Kane creates beautiful commemorative landscape oil paintings with a palette knife. She chooses to work with a palette knife as it takes part of the control out of her hands, and leaves the painting up to chance. In doing so, a sort of magic happens in which she is guiding but not controlling.

The basis of her paintings is to create a lasting, interpretive portrait of a given time and place, serving as a form of historical preservation. She aims to bring awareness through visual depiction and celebration of the landscape as home, as sacred, as something priceless to be tended with care.

Jeremy Drey

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
September 18, 2014 – January 8, 2015

 

“Making images with an out of date process seemed only appropriate when capturing old mechanical items that have also become out of date,” he says of this collection of photographs captured on traditional black and white film. “The relaxing approach to this photography has allowed me to hone an artistic style in all aspects of my photography life.”

Jeremy Drey is a 2006 Penn State graduate and is staff photographer for the Reading Eagle.

Justice: Faces of the Human Rights Revolution

Robeson Gallery
September 25 – November 28, 2014

 

In 2010, photographer Mariana Cook set out to discover why some people have the courage to look injustice in the face when so many others avert their gaze. Her quest took her all over the world to capture both the well-known and the lesser-known faces of the people who felt so passionately about fairness and freedom that they risked their livelihoods and their lives to pursue justice.

Each black and white photographic portrait is coupled with a short first-person account describing what compels each of these human rights activists to fight. Represented in the exhibition are judges, lawyers, politicians, sociologists, anthropologists, clergymen, physicians, and writers – including former President Jimmy Carter, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Aung San Suu Kyi, Kofi Annan, and Richard Goldstone. The exhibition encompasses numerous countries and causes such as the struggle for civil rights in South Africa, the documentation of war atrocities in Serbia, and the championing of women’s rights in Zimbabwe.

Mariana Cook is the last protégé of internationally known American photographer Ansel Adams. Cook’s works are held in numerous collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Portrait Gallery, The J. Paul Getty Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

This exhibit is co-sponsored by the Paul Robeson Cultural Center.

Storied Images: Marcellus Shale

Art Alley
October 2 – December 7, 2014

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
October 6 – November 30, 2014

 

Criss-crossing the state on multiple faculty-led field trips, students of diverse backgrounds, interests, majors and experiences investigated and photographed an array of effects from hydraulic fracturing, otherwise known as fracking - a controversial technique used to extract natural gas from shale rock layers deep within the earth.

Interacting with and learning from industry professionals, geologists, environmentalists, and landowners, students photographed drill sites, farms, state forests, businesses, landowners, shale workers, training programs, small towns and protest rallies both for and against gas development. Seeking to document diverse experiences among those occupying divergent viewpoints about the energy and economic benefits of the gas boom and its social, health, and environmental costs, the overarching goal of this project is to generate dialogue and reflection amidst a larger discussion about energy production, consumption and sustainability.

The images were produced by students enrolled in the courses Photo 402: Photographic Narratives and Photo 497D: Photography and the Environment during the Spring 2014 semester, with additional field trips extending into the summer. Steven Rubin, Associate Professor of Art in the School of Visual Arts’ photography program, and Co-PI and creator of the Photo 497D: Photography and the Environment course Katarin Parizek oversee this project in collaboration with David Yoxtheimer of the Marcellus Center for Outreach and Research. Funding has been generously provided by the Sustainability Institute’s Reinvention Fund, with assistance from the School of Visual Arts and the Palmer Museum of Art.

In addition to the HUB exhibit, Storied Images: Marcellus Shale will be on display in various venues throughout Penn State’s University Park campus and the surrounding community during the Fall 2014 semester. All of these exhibitions are timed to coincide with the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project, a major exhibition on display at the Palmer Museum of Art, September 23 - December 14, 2014.

Weavings by Julia Weldon

Display Cases
October 6, 2014 – January 14, 2015

 

This collection, begun in 2001 and completed in 2014, is inspired by the weaving traditions of many cultures. The handbags and wall hangings in this exhibit were all influenced and inspired by designs, motifs, and weave structures from Japan, Mexico, Guatemala, Bhutan, Peru, Bolivia, and Indonesia. Looms used include four-harness floor loom, back-strap loom, marudai (Japanese Braiding Loom), cardboard loom, and tablet loom. This exhibit explores a small part of the wide array of possibilities using these simple tools.

Julia was born in Shreveport, Louisiana, and holds a B.F.A. and M.F.A. in Modern Dance Performance and Choreography. After retiring from her career in dance, Julia’s first experience in weaving came in Mesa, Arizona where she learned traditional Navaho weaving. She moved to the Central Pennsylvania area in 1994 where she continues to explore new weaving techniques and is an active member of the State College Weavers Guild.

ART-illery

Display Cases
October 16 – December 7, 2014

 

Uniforms and jeans from veterans and community members are shredded, beaten, pressed into screens, then embellished with pulp to become powerful works of art. The stories within the fibers are explored, creating the opportunity for the community to own their collective experience with conflict, service, and community, and to learn lessons of the past.

This exhibit features works created during a free and open-to-the-public workshop hosted by visiting artist Patrick Sargent held in the HUB-Robeson Center on October 14, and in Wagner Drill Space on October 15 and 16. ART-illery is supported by Adult Learner Programs and Services in Student Affairs.

2013

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 4 – January 19, 2013

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two— and three—dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community.

Negar Fadaei Dehkordi

Art on the Move — Old Main
January 21 – April 23, 2013

 

The photographs were taken in Tehran. My work tends to focus on the society and culture of the my home country, Iran. I believe people’s personalities and lifestyles reflect not only in their appearance and behavior, but also in every detail surrounding them. In this series, I have taken pictures of seemingly unimportant details from the street, to show what type of society there is in Tehran. By showing only details, I have limited what the viewer sees, alluding to the censorship that is imposed be Iran’s government.

The Life and Work of César Chávez

Art Alley
January 16 – February 24, 2013

 

The HUB-Robeson Galleries presents In His Own Words: The Life and Work of César Chávez, an exhibition of photographs and autobiographical reflections produced by Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. In His Own Words is made possible by a We the People grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Alice Kelsey

Art on the Move — Old Main
January 30 – May 5, 2013

 

I have always lived in rural areas, and feel deeply connected to the forms and forces within the landscape. Working primarily in oil and pastel, I strive to convey the atmosphere of a particular time and place, the depth of the moment which caught my eye. I’m especially inspired by the every-changing nuances of light and color in the landscape, as they transform with phases of the day and season. I enjoy working on location with a backpacker french easel and minimalist supplies, as well as in the studio from memory and evoked images.

Alice Kelsey is a full-time painter residing in central Pennsylvania. Her artistic development extends back to childhood sketching sessions with her grandfather, through outstanding art instruction in high school, and courses in painting and printmaking throughout college. Alice Kelsey has exhibited her work and received awards at regional and national shows, and is a juried member of the Maryland Pastel Society.

Yongtaek Lee

HUB Gallery
January 31 – March 12, 2013

 

An invisible boundary exists around human beings. Between people and people, nature and nature, people and nature, civilization and civilization, wilderness and wilderness, civilization and wilderness, and so forth. People living in a certain boundary are also the same. Are people in the boundary between science and non-science, who say a certainty and/or uncertainty of the boundary? Where is a painting (art) located between science and non-science? Is the painting a science or not?

Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania Annual Juried Exhibition Celebrating 45 Years

Robeson Gallery
February 14 – April 21, 2013

 

This exhibition celebrates the 45th Anniversary of the Art Alliance of Central Pennsylvania and showcases the work of the area's many talented artists. "Our community supports and values our artists and has made it possible for the Art Alliance to reach this important milestone in our history," says Marie Doll, Executive Director. The juror for this show is Leo Mazow, associate professor of art history at the University of Arkansas.

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 22 – April 21, 2013

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to present their work in a professional setting.

Penn State Center for Arts & Crafts Annual Artists and Instructors Exhibition

Art Alley, Display Cases
March 28 – April 28, 2013

 

The Penn State Center for Arts and Crafts instructors will showcase their artwork. The Center for Arts and Crafts has offered non-credit adult art classes to Penn State students, faculty, and staff during each of the university semesters and a children's summer camp for more than 30 years. The Center for Arts and Crafts is located in 3 Ritenour and has a ceramics studio in B8 HUB.

Inner Connections — Marlee Erwin

HUB Gallery
May 14 – July 28, 2013

 

A member of the Pennsylvania Watercolor Society, Marlee has been painting since she was very young, and describes her process as an intense experience that takes her "to a different dimension."

"I've always been in love with color," Marlee says. "When I paint flowers, I want to feel their color, not just see it." The display will feature twelve of her large-scale watercolor paintings of flowers.

A Family Affair — Abby & Jeremy Drey

Art Alley
May 21 – September 4, 2013

 

The sibling photographers will be displaying 24 prints together. Abby, a 2010 Penn State graduate and staff photographer for the Centre Daily Times will display 12 color photographs that were captured over the last several years at various locations. Jeremy, a 2006 Penn State graduate and staff photographer for the Reading Eagle will display 12 photographs captured on traditional black and white film.

Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts — Images 2013

Robeson Gallery
June 5 – July 14, 2013

 

Images 2013 is a component of the 47th Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. Images 2013 is a juried show open to all artists residing in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, and the District of Columbia. Eligible categories of work include paintings, drawings, hand-pulled prints, photography, mixed media, fiber, ceramic, and small sculpture.

Crossing Borders: A Conversation

HUB Gallery
September 11 – December 8, 2013

 

Dr. Stephen Hirshon and Professor Yongtaek Lee met by chance as the result of an English as a Second Language class. Dr. Hirshon’s son Elliot, the teacher, connected with David Lee, one of the students. Later, the two young men encouraged their families to share a traditional American Thanksgiving and a traditional Korean dinner. While facing some difficulties communicating in their native languages — English and Korean — Dr. Hirshon and Professor Lee, the two patriarchs of the families, discovered that they could understand each other by sharing their respective photographs and paintings.

In Dr. Hirshon’s photographs, the playful dance of light and shadow, and enigmatic convergence of form and space reveal a rich, inward reality. In Professor Lee’s paintings, the variety of feathered and invisible brushstrokes, weightless and dense forms suggest a fluid sense of time peopled by traces of ambiguous memories and experiences. Together, Dr. Hirshon and Professor Lee envision their first joint show as an opportunity to learn more about each other through their art.

Joanne Landis

Art Alley
September 17, 2013 – March 4, 2014

 

Joanne Landis' paintings are large-scale narrative murals featuring bold strokes, textures, and patterns. She states, "I don't plan the painting. I start with an idea. The painting starts to direct me. It's kind of like a dream, where you find things as you go and things just happen." Much of the selected work was completed during a month-long residency at Ireland's Tyrone Guthrie Centre for the Arts.

Faculty Collections: School of Visual Arts Alumni Work

Robeson Gallery
September 27 – December 1, 2013

 

This exhibit features many pieces, created in a wide range of mediums including ceramics, drawings, paintings, photographs, prints, and sculptures, all of which are housed in the personal collections of School of Visual Arts faculty members.

Michaela Amateau, curator of the show, states: “Many of us faculty have acquired paintings, sculptures, ceramics, prints, and photographs from our students over the years, that we believed were brilliant, breathtaking, and absolutely had to have. Over the years these works have been a tremendous source of pleasure for us, and have offered us great insight into how students have developed their professional work.”

Flytying by Shawn Davis

Display Cases
September 27, 2013 – January 14, 2014

 

Shawn Davis blends artistic fly tying and goldsmithing to create truly unique jewelry art. Many of Davis’ flies are patterns he has created himself, which he describes as being “uncompromising technically and understated artistically.” Davis hand-fashions hooks from 18-karat gold, then dresses them with silks and feathers in just a few complementary colors, doing so because beauty does not need to be complicated, and because impact can be much more powerful when suggestive rather than overt.

Shawn Davis began creating fly tying jewelry art in 2002, and released his first pieces to the public in 2007. He has been a featured tier at the International Fly Tying Symposium and the Anglers’ Club of New York, and his work has been featured in various fly tying and jewelry arts magazines, including American Angler, Lady Angler Life, Danica, The Drake, and Adornment. Davis has also been a featured artist on the Anthropologist by Anthropologie.

Stephen Cohen

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
December 9, 2013 – March 2, 2014

 

Stephen Cohen’s work explores the varying relationships between our environment and everyday social standards. Cohen’s goal is to make everyone recognize the social phenomenon of focusing attention on hand held devices rather than our surroundings. He paints trees not only because of their brilliance, but also because of how trees relate to all of us; as they grow, they eventually branch out and experience life in all different directions. People follow the same pattern.

Leslie Sotomayor

Art on the Move — Old Main
December 9, 2013 – May 18, 2014

 

Leslie C. Sotomayor's work revolves around themes of memories, nostalgia, and how the culmination of our experiences build our heritage and identity. These large color field paintings are created with many layers of acrylic stains worked back and forth; they're then cropped, stretched, and re-worked. This process is similar to life experiences, which build and re-shape history, the present, and the future.

2012

State College Area School District Annual K-12 Exhibition

Robeson Gallery
January 4 – January 21, 2012

 

The State College Area School District is honored to bring forward some of the best work from their student artists, grades kindergarten through twelve. Many two— and three—dimensional media are represented as are many hours of skilled and creative work from children throughout our community.

Kimber Lee Kolinoski

Art on the Move — North Halls Cultural Lounge
January 12 – March 14, 2012

 

Everything is composed of lines, whether they are straight, curvy, fat, skinny, rigid or flat. This display features linear, abstract paintings with a figurative underpinning. The subjects of the paintings are simplified, yet the repetition of line produces a feeling of motion and vibration. Kim Kalinoski is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Drawing and Painting from Penn State University.

Devan Shimoyama

Art Alley
January 16 – March 11, 2012

 

As he draws inspiration from his own encounters, Shimoyama looks beyond the surface and reveals the repression and rejection felt by America's urban youth. His use of mixed media allows for the representation of traumatic, life-altering experiences and the forms of healing that follow.

Lauren Down

Art on the Move — West Halls Cultural Lounge
January 16 – April 29, 2012

 

Lauren’s intaglio prints express the stories of her family, a constant influence in her life. The prints create a push and pull between color, lines and understanding. Lauren is currently a senior at Penn State, acquiring her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Printmaking with a minor in Business.

Hateful Things

HUB Gallery
January 18 – February 26, 2012

 

Hateful Things is a traveling exhibit from Ferris State University's Jim Crow Museum. Featuring a collection of material objects that trace the history of racism in America, this exhibit seeks to stimulate the scholarly examination of racism. The 39-piece exhibition consists of items of popular culture from the late 19th century through the present day. These objects now serve as powerful reminders of America's racist past, as well as promotions for racial understanding and healing.

Katelyn Monahan

Sculpture Corner
January 26 – May 6, 2012

 

Katelyn Monahan’s most recent sculpture embodies the spirit of collage but on a much larger-scale format. This work consisted of building a girl’s framework to scale using rebar and plaster casts for limbs and head. Once the framework was complete, Katelyn was able to hone in on any additional materials that could further drive home the conceptual significance of the piece, which she finished with vanilla icing and baby’s breath.

Photos by Kelly Kostelnik

Art on the Move — Old Main
February 20 – May 2, 2012

 

Kostelnik’s passion for sports and action photography has inspired her to capture a collection of photographs featuring horses and their riders.

Stephen Althouse

Robeson Gallery
February 14 – April 22, 2012

 

Althouse's photographs feature cryptic assemblages of found and fabricated objects that relate to significant life events. Althouse captures both positive and negative attributes of humankind with an emphasis on human experiences and interactions. Each image contains unique metaphors laced with visual autobiographical narrative themes.

Luke Brezovec

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
March 17 – May 6, 2012

Art on the Move — Old Main
May 10 – June 1, 2012

 

Luke is a sophomore majoring in Integrative Arts and Biochemistry. During a research internship in Germany this past summer, he had the opportunity to photograph many unique places across multiple countries. He focused on photographing surreal architecture, especially abandoned and ruined buildings, including an orphanage in Belgium, a Nazi military base outside Potsdam, a soap factory in the heart of Berlin, and a hospital that treated Hitler in Beelitz, Germany.

School of Visual Arts Annual Graduate Research Exhibition

HUB Gallery
March 23 – April 24, 2012

 

This juried exhibition displays the studio art portion of the Annual Graduate Research Exhibition, offering students the opportunity to present their work in a professional setting.

Penn State Center for Arts & Crafts Annual Artists and Instructors Exhibition

Art Alley, Display Cases
March 30 – April 22, 2012

 

The Penn State Center for Arts and Crafts' instructors will showcase their artwork. The Center for Arts and Crafts has offered non-credit adult art classes to Penn State students, faculty, and staff during each of the university semesters and a children's summer camp for more than 30 years. The Center for Arts and Crafts is located in 3 Ritenour and has a ceramics studio in B8 HUB.

A Day A Photo — Will Yurman

Art Alley
May 14 – August 1, 2012

 

On the last day of 2003, Yurman took a photo and posted it to his website. He has continued to post one photograph every day for the past eight years, capturing over 3000 unique stories. On his website, Yurman describes his project as "part diary, part sketch pad." His photographs allow the viewer to see the world from his perspective. The subjects of his pieces are extremely varied, ranging from serious news events to playful celebrations.

Photography by Norris Lacy

Art on the Move — Student Health Center
May 18 – August 29, 2012

 

Lacy’s pieces are hazily influenced by nature. Scenes of summer are the main focus of this exhibit. Fascinated by digital manipulation, Lacy embraces the vast possibilities available with modern photographic technology.

The Railroad in American Life

HUB Gallery
May 31 – July 29, 2012

 

This exhibit features 30 American railroad artists from all parts of the country. Special attention has been paid to Pennsylvania artists and Pennsylvania subjects. The works offer a variety of mediums, from West Virginia wood burning artist Paul Ends, to a massive wood carving by Virginia artist David Cunningham, and the drilled wood paintings of Doris Jean Silva. Other portrayals are executed in oils, watercolors, and line art. Individually, the works depict all manner of railroading settings and activity. Collectively, they present the viewer with an overview of the many ways railroads have influenced our history, setting, and culture.

Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts — Images 2012

Robeson Gallery
June 5 – July 15, 2012

 

Images 2012 is a component of the 46th Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. Images 2012 is a juried show open to all artists residing in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, and the District of Columbia. Eligible categories of work include paintings, drawings, hand-pulled prints, photography, mixed media, fiber, ceramic, and small sculpture.

Politics as Usual — Kofi Ofori

Art Alley
August 31 – December 2, 2012

 

Ofori's exhibition harnesses mixed media to explore tacit themes of corruption, deception, ignorance, and a modern moral poverty. Kofi states, "It's easy to point the finger and ignore the importance to stay educated and take responsibility for ourselves in an environment where pointing the finger is generally preferred. Violence and money, or is it violence for money or money for violence? Our future is being destroyed right under our noses with the poor getting poorer and staying uneducated and the rich getting richer. We should all fear the future. Money can't be trusted, neither can mankind."

Figure Heads — Kaeley Boyle

Art on the Move — North Halls
September 5 – December 2, 2012

 

Spending the first part of her life with her face in the water, Kaeley uses her years swimming to help look at art differently. She taps into several aspects of physical representation to search for what constitutes a painting. By using the idea of erasure, she poses certain questions about the disintegration of human interaction. As a consequence Kaeley’s work has evolved and become less and less visible itself. For this exhibition Kaeley used scale and medium to envelop the viewer and pose as a commentary on typical “portraiture.”

Julie Tremblay Reflection Series

HUB Gallery
September 7 – December 9, 2012

 

This exhibition will display Julie Tremblay's nine, life-size, figurative sculptures, made out of salvaged, stamped-out sheets of tin plated steel, used to make bottle caps. The sculptures are a reflection on humanity and our contemporary society. This body of work shown in the gallery was started in 2007 and completed in 2008.

The College of Arts and Architecture: Celebrating 50 Years

Display Cases
September 21 – December 12, 2012

 

Memorabilia from the College of Arts and Architecture in celebration of their 50 Year Anniversary will be on display in the HUB.

Fifty years ago, education in the arts and design at Penn State took a huge leap forward with the establishment of the College of Arts and Architecture. From disciplines formerly housed in the Colleges of Agricultural Sciences, Engineering, and Liberal Arts, the College of Arts and Architecture has diversified and expanded, enjoying a prominent role in the cultural and artistic community of Penn State and far beyond.

The work of talented faculty, students and alumni make the College of Arts and Architecture what it is today — an exciting and inspiring place to perform, research, study, and create.

The Decade Show — 
State College Area School District Alumni Exhibition
 1982 – 2012: 30 Years of Alumni Art

Robeson Gallery
September 28 – November 18, 2012

 

This multi-media exhibition will feature State College Area School District alumni (1982-2012) who are working professionally in a variety of art careers. State High alumni, who have continued their art training and graduated from an art school or university, will be featured. The exhibit will be a group show. State High alumni are art educators, architects, landscape designers, photographers, graphic designers, animators, illustrators, sculptors, filmmakers, artists, and current art students at a variety of art schools and universities. State College alumni are working at Disney, Pixar, Adidas, and their own design companies. The exhibition will showcase the rich art foundation that the students have gained from the dedication of the State College Area School District's art faculty.

Past Exhibits before 2012
If you are looking for information on exhibits before 2012, please contact the HUB-Robeson Galleries for assistance.
Email the HUB-Robeson Center Galleries for assistance